Glossary

Select headwordChoose sense from the list below
mace
Machiavel
machination
machine
maculate
maculation
mad
madam
mad-bred
madcap
madded
madding
made
madonna
madrigal
maggot-pie
magic
magistrate
magnanimious
magnanimity
magnanimous
magni
magnificent
magnifico
maid
maiden
maidenhead
maidhood
maid-pale
mail
mailed
maim
maimed
main
main a
main-course
mainly
mainport
mainsail
maintain
main-top
majestical
major
majority
make
makeless
make-peace
making
malady of France
malapert
malcontent
male
malediction
malefaction
malice
malicious
maliciously
malign
malignancy
malkin
mallard
mallecho
mallow
malmsey
malmsey-nose
malthorse
maltworm
mammer
mammet
mammock
man
man at arms
man of wax
manage
manager
mandate
mandragora
mandrake
man-entered
mangle
manhood
manifest
manifested
manifoldly
manikin
mankind
manly
manner
mannerly
mannish
man-of-arms
manor
man-queller
mansion
mansionry
mantle
mantled
manu
many
many a day, for this
map
mappery
mar
marble
marbled
marcantant
march
March-chick
marchpane
mare
margent
mark
mark a
mark b
market
market-man
marking
markman
marl
marmoset
married
marring
marrow
marry
marshal
mart
martial
martialist
martlemas
martlet
martyr
martyred
marvel
marvellous
Mary-bud
masculine
mash
mask
masoned
masonry
masque
masquing
mass
massy
mast
master
master-cord
masterdom
masterless
masterly
mastership
mastic
match
mate
mate and make
mated
material
matin
matron
matter
mattock
mature
maugre
maund
maw
may
maying
maze
mazed
mazzard
me
me pompae
meacock
mead
meagre
meal
mealy
mean
mean a
mean-apparelled
mean-born
meander
meaner
meanest
meaning
meanly
measles
measurable
measure
measuring
meat
mechanic
mechanical
medal
meddle
meddling
medice
medicinable
medicine
medicine a
medicine potable
meditance
meditate
meditation
medlar
meed
meet
meetly
meetness
meiny
melancholy
mell
mellowed
melting
member
memento
memorial
memorize
memory
mend
mended
merchandise
merchant
merchant-marring
mercy
mere
mered
merely
meridian
merit
mermaid
merry
mervailous
mess
message, of
messenger
met
metal
metal of India
metamorphose
metamorphosed
metaphysical
mete
meteor
mete-yard
metheglin
methinks
method
methought
metre
mettle
mew
mewl
micher
miching
mickle
microcosm
middle earth
mid-season
mighty
milch
milch-kine
militarist
milk-livered
milk-pap
milky
millioned
mill-sixpence
mimic
mince
minced
mincing
mind
minded
mine
mineral
mingle
minikin
minimus
minion
minister
minnow
minority
minstrel
minstrelsy
minute
minute-jack
minutely
mirable
miracle
mire
mirror
mirth
misadventure
misadventured
Misanthropos
misbecome
misbecomingly
misbegot
misbegotten
miscall
miscarry
mischance
mischief
mischievous
misconster
misconstruction
miscreant
miscreate
misdemean
misdo
misdoubt
misdread
miser
misery
misgive
misgoverned
misgovernment
misgraffed
mishap
mishaved
mislike
misordered
misplace
misprised
misprision
misprize
misprizing
misproud
misreport
miss
missed
misshapen
mis-sheathe
missing
missingly
missive
misspeak
mist
mistake
mistempered
mistful
misthink
misthought
mistreading
mistrust
mistrustful
misuse
mitigate
mitigation
mo
moan
mobled
mock
mocked, well
mockery
mocking
model
modern
modest
modestly
modesty
modicum
module
moe
moiety
moist
moist star
moldwarp
mole
molest
molestation
mollification
mollis
mome
moment
momentany
monarchize
monarcho
monopoly
monsieur
monster
monstrous
monstruosity
montant
monument
monumental
mood
moody
moody-mad
moon, below the
mooncalf
moonish
moonshine
mop
mope
moped
moping
mopping
moral
moralise
moraller
more
more a
more-having
moreover
morisco
morn
morn-dew
morris
morris, nine men's
morris-pike
morrow
morsel
mort
mortal
mortality
mortally
mortal-staring
mortar-piece
mortgage
mortified
mortifying
mortise
mose in the chine
most
mot
mote
mother
mother-wit
motion
motive
motley
motley-minded
mould
moulten
mount
mountain
mountaineer
mountain-foot
mountain-squire
mountant
mountanto
mountebank
mounted
mounting
mournful
mourningly
mouse
mouse-hunt
mouth
mouthed
mouth-friend
mouth-honour
movable
move
moveable
moved
mover
moving
mow
mowing
moy
much
mud
muddied
muddy
muddy-mettled
muffle
muffled
muleteer
mulled
multiplied
multipotent
multitude
multitudinous
mum
mumble
mumble-news
mummer
mummy
mundane
muniment
mural
murder
murdering-piece
mure
murmur
murrain
murrion
murther
muscadel
muse
muset
mushrump
music
musit
musk-cat
muss
mussel-shell
mustachio
muster
muster-file
mutability
mutation
mute
mutine
mutiny
mutton
mutual
mutuality
mutually
mynheer
mystery
mark (n.) 1target, goal, aim
mark (n.) 2reach, aim, range
mark (n.) 3shot at a target
mark (n.) 4notable sight, object of serious attention
mark (n.) 5(plural) insignia, regalia
mark (n.) 6birthmark, discolouration, blemish
mark (n.) 7mark used as a signature by an illiterate person
mark (v.) 1note, pay attention [to], take notice [of]
mark (v.) 2destine, brand, designate
Choosing a line reference will open up a new page, taking you to that point in the text. This Glossary page will remain open.
AC II.v.32 [Cleopatra to Messenger] But, sirrah, mark, we use / To say the dead are well
AYL II.i.41 [First Lord to Duke Senior, of a wounded deer] Much marked of the melancholy Jaques
AYL III.iv.51 [Corin to Rosalind as Ganymede, of a meeting between Silvius and Phebe] Go hence a little and I shall conduct you, / If you will mark it
AYL III.v.125 [Phebe to Silvius, of Rosalind as Ganymede] There be some women, ... had they marked him / In parcels, as I did
AYL IV.iii.40 [Rosalind as Ganymede to Silvius, of Phebe] mark how the tyrant writes
AYL IV.iii.104 [Oliver to Rosalind as Ganymede and Celia as Aliena] mark what object did present itself!
CE IV.iv.49 [Courtesan to Pinch, of Antipholus of Ephesus] Mark how he trembles in his ecstasy
Cor I.i.139 [Menenius to Citizens] You, my good friends, this says the belly, mark me
Cor I.i.253 [Brutus to Sicinius, of Martius] Marked you his lip and eyes?
Cor I.iv.45 [Martius to Soldiers, of entering the city] Mark me, and do the like
Cor II.ii.144 [Brutus to Sicinius, of what Coriolanus has said] Mark you that?
Cor II.iii.39 [Menenius to all, of Coriolanus] Mark his behaviour
Cor III.i.90 [Coriolanus to all, of what Sicinius has just said] Mark you / His absolute ‘shall’?
Cor III.iii.74 [Sicinius to Plebeians, of what Coriolanus has said] Mark you this, people?
Cor V.iii.92 [Coriolanus to the Volscians] Aufidius, and you Volsces, mark
Cor V.iv.26 [Menenius to all, of Coriolanus] Mark what mercy his mother shall bring from him
Cym I.i.58 [First Gentleman to Second Gentleman] if this be worth your hearing, / Mark it
E3 II.i.432 [Warwick to Countess] mark how I unsay my words again
Ham I.i.43 [Barnardo to Horatio, of the Ghost] Looks 'a not like the King? Mark it
Ham I.v.2 [Ghost to Hamlet] Mark me
Ham II.i.15 [Polonius to Reynaldo, of what he has been saying] do you mark this
Ham II.i.41 [Polonius to Reynaldo, of criticism of Laertes] As 'twere a thing a little soiled i'th' working, / Mark you
Ham III.ii.156 [Ophelia to Hamlet] I'll mark the play
Ham II.ii.107 [Polonius to Claudius, of Ophelia and her letter] Who in her duty and obedience, mark, / Hath given me this
Ham II.ii.164 [Polonius to Claudius, of Hamlet meeting Ophelia] Mark the encounter
Ham II.ii.385 [Hamlet to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, of Polonius] I will prophesy he comes to tell me of the players. Mark it
Ham III.ii.120 [Polonius to Claudius, of what Hamlet has said] O ho! Do you mark that?
Ham III.ii.214 [First Player as King to his Queen] The great man down, you mark his favourite flies
Ham IV.v.28 [Ophelia to Gertrude] Say you? Nay, pray you, mark
Ham V.i.17 [First Clown to Second Clown] If the man go to this water and drown himself, it is, will he nill he, he goes, mark you that
Ham V.i.218 [Hamlet to Horatio, of watching Ophelia's funeral] Couch we awhile, and mark
Ham V.i.220 [Hamlet to Laertes] That is Laertes, a very noble youth. Mark
1H4 I.ii.85 [Falstaff to Prince Hal] An old lord of the Council rated me the other day in the street about you, sir, but I marked him not
1H4 II.iv.206 [Prince Hal to Falstaff, responding to ‘Dost thou hear me, Hal?’] Ay, and mark thee too, Jack
1H4 II.iv.247 [Poins to Falstaff, taking up Hal's ‘hear me speak but this’] Mark, Jack!
1H4 II.iv.250 [Prince Hal to Falstaff] mark now how a plain tale shall put you down
1H4 III.i.104 [Mortimer to all, of a river] mark how he bears his course
1H4 III.i.133 [Hotspur to all] in the way of bargain, mark ye me, / I'll cavil on the ninth part of a hair
1H4 III.i.153 [Hotspur to Mortimer, of listening to Glendower] I cried ‘Hum’, and ‘Well, go to!’ / But marked him not a word
2H4 I.ii.123 [Falstaff to Lord Chief Justice] it is the disease of not listening, the malady of not marking, that I am troubled withal
2H4 V.v.7 [Falstaff to Shallow, of King Henry V] do but mark the countenance that he will give me
H5 IV.iii.104 [King Henry to Montjoy] Mark then abounding valour in our English
H5 IV.iv.8 [Pistol to French Soldier] Perpend my words, O Signieur Dew, and mark
H5 V.vii.3 [Fluellen to Gower, of killing the boys] 'tis as arrant a piece of knavery, mark you now, as can be offert
H5 IV.vii.30 [Fluellen to Gower] If you mark Alexander's life well
1H6 II.v.79 [Mortimer to Richard, of those previously involved in the succession] But mark: as in this haughty great attempt / They laboured to plant the rightful heir, / I lost my liberty
1H6 III.i.155 [Gloucester to King] if your grace mark every circumstance, / You have great reason to do Richard right
1H6 III.iii.68 [Pucelle to Burgundy] Call we to mind, and mark but this for proof: / Was not the Duke of Orleans thy foe?
3H6 III.iii.169 [Prince to Oxford] mark how Lewis stamps as he were nettled
H8 II.iv.169 [King Henry to all] Then mark th'inducement
H8 III.ii.439 [Cardinal to Cromwell] Mark but my fall
H8 IV.ii.98 [Patience to Griffith, of Katherine] Mark her eyes
JC I.ii.120 [Cassius to Brutus, of Caesar] I did mark / How he did shake
JC I.ii.126 [Cassius to Brutus, of Caesar] that tongue of his, that bade the Romans / Mark him and write his speeches in their books
JC I.ii.234 [Casca to Brutus and Cassius, of how Caesar was offered the crown] it was mere foolery; I did not mark it
JC II.iii.3 [Artemidorus reading his letter to Caesar] mark well Metellus Cimber
JC III.i.18 [Brutus to Cassius, of Popilius] Look how he makes to Caesar: mark him
JC III.ii.113 [Fourth Plebeian to others, of Antony] Marked ye his words?
JC III.ii.118 [Fourth Plebeian to others, of Antony] Now mark him; he begins again to speak
JC III.ii.179 [Antony to all, of Brutus' stab-wound] Mark how the blood of Caesar followed it
KJ II.i.475 [Queen Eleanor to King John, of the French] Mark, how they whisper
KJ III.iv.131 [Cardinal Pandulph to Lewis the Dauphin] therefore mark: / John hath seized Arthur
KJ IV.iii.85 [Hubert to Salisbury] I would not have you, lord, forget yourself ... / Lest I, by marking of your rage, forget / Your worth
KL I.iv.116 [Fool to Lear, of his rhyme] Mark it, nuncle
KL I.iv.307 [Gonerill to Albany, of what Lear has said] Do you mark that?
KL II.iv.148 [Lear to Regan, of his kneeling] Do you but mark how this becomes the house
KL III.vi.109 [disguised Edgar alone] Mark the high noises
KL IV.vi.139 [Lear to Gloucester] Read thou this challenge; mark but the penning of it
KL IV.vi.181 [Lear to Gloucester] I will preach to thee--Mark!
KL V.iii.37 [Edmund to Captain, of carrying out his orders] Mark, I say ‘instantly’
LLL IV.i.132 [Boyet to Maria] A mark! O, mark but that mark! [second instance]
LLL IV.iii.98 [Berowne to Dumaine] Once more I'll mark how love can vary wit
LLL IV.iii.136 [King to Longaville and Dumaine] I have been closely shrouded in this bush / And marked you both
LLL V.ii.173 [Mote to all, of the audience] They do not mark me, and that brings me out
LLL V.ii.817 [Katharine to Dumaine] I'll mark no words that smooth-faced wooers say
Luc 510 [of Tarquin] Harmless Lucretia, marking what he tells
MA I.i.109 [Beatrice to Benedick] I wonder that you will still be talking, Signor Benedick; nobody marks you
MA I.i.196 [Benedick to Don Pedro, of Claudio] mark you this, on my allegiance--he is in love
MA II.i.133 [masked Bbeatrice to masked Benedick, of Benedick] he'll but break a comparison or two on me, which, peradventure not marked or not laughed at, strikes him into melancholy
MA IV.i.156 [Friar to all, of Hero] I have marked / A thousand blushing apparitions / To start into her face
Mac I.ii.28 [Captain to Duncan] Mark, King of Scotland, mark!
Mac IV.iii.169 [Ross to Macduff, of Scotland] Where sighs and groans and shrieks that rent the air / Are made, not marked
Mac V.i.40 [Doctor to Gentlewoman, of what Lady Macbeth has said] Do you mark that?
MM II.i.142 [Pompey to Escalus, of Froth] Doth your honour mark his face?
MM II.iv.81 [Angelo to Isabella] But mark me; / To be received plain, I'll speak more gross
MM III.i.219 [disguised Duke to Isabella, of the events affecting Mariana] mark how heavily this befell to the poor gentlewoman
MM IV.iii.124 [disguised Duke to Isabella] Mark what I say
MND II.i.127 [Titania to Oberon, of the mother of her Indian boy] [she] sat with me on Neptune's yellow sands / Marking th'embarked traders on the flood
MND II.i.165 [Oberon to Puck] Yet marked I where the bolt of Cupid fell
MND III.i.125 [Bottom singing, of various birds] Whose note full many a man doth mark
MND IV.i.92 [Puck to Oberon] Fairy king, attend, and mark
MND IV.i.109 [Theseus to Hippolyta] We will ... up to the mountain's top, / And mark the musical confusion / Of hounds and echo in conjunction
MND V.i.269 [Bottom as Pyramus to himself] But mark, poor Knight, / What dreadful dole is here?
MV I.iii.74 [Shylock to Antonio] Mark what Jacob did
MV I.iii.94 [Antonio to Bassanio, of Shylock] Mark you this, Bassanio, / The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose
MV II.ii.44 [Launcelot to himself, of talking to Gobbo] Mark me now, now will I raise the waters
MV IV.i.310 [Gratiano to Shylock, of Portia as Balthasar] Mark, Jew. O learned judge!
MV V.i.88 [Lorenzo to Jessica] Mark the music
MV V.i.243 [Portia to all, of what Bassanio has said] Mark you but that!
MW III.v.98 [Falstaff to Ford as Brook, of what happened] mark the sequel,
MW IV.i.39 [Evans to William] Pray you mark
Oth I.i.44 [Iago to Roderigo] You shall mark / Many a duteous and knee-crooking knave
Oth II.i.216 [Iago to Roderigo, of Desdemona] Mark me with what violence she first loved the Moor
Oth II.i.247 [Iago to Roderigo, of Desdemona and Cassio] Didst thou not see her paddle with the palm of his hand? Didst not mark that?
Oth IV.i.82 [Iago to Othello, of Cassio] Do but encave yourself, / And mark the fleers, the gibes, and notable scorns / That dwell in every region of his face
Oth IV.i.87 [Iago to Othello, of Cassio] I say, but mark his gestures
Oth IV.i.283 [Iago to Lodovico, of Othello] Do but go after, / And mark how he continues
PassP XIV.17 [] While Philomela sits and sings, I sit and mark, / And wish her lays were tuned like the lark
Per IV.ii.111 [Bawd to Marina] Mark me
Per V.i.79 [Lysimachus to Marina, of Pericles] Marked he your music?
R2 I.i.36 [Bolingbroke to Mowbray] mark my greeting well
R2 III.iii.61 [Bolingbroke to all] March on, and mark King Richard, how he looks
R2 IV.i.202 [Richard to all] Now mark me how I will undo myself
R2 IV.i.289 [Richard to Bolingbroke] Mark ... the moral of this sport
R2 V.iv.1 [Exton to man, of King Henry] Didst thou not mark the King, what words he spake?
R3 I.iii.348 [Richard to Murderers] Clarence is well-spoken, and perhaps / May move your hearts to pity if you mark him
R3 II.i.136 [Richard to Buckingham] Marked you not / How that the guilty kindred of the Queen / Looked pale
R3 III.vi.4 [Scrivener aloneg, of what he has written] mark how well the sequel hangs together
RJ II.iv.172 [Romeo to Nurse] Thou dost not mark me
RJ III.iv.17 [Capulet to Lady Capulet, of Jujliet] bid her - mark you me?- on Wednesday next
Sonn 8.9 [of instruments] Mark how one string, sweet husband to another, / Strikes each in each by mutual ordering
Sonn 112.12 [] Mark how with my neglect I do dispense
TC I.ii.184 [Pandarus to Cressida, of the soldiers] mark Troilus above the rest.
TC I.ii.231 [Pandarus to Cressida] Mark him, note him. O brave Troilus!
TC V.vii.2 [Achilles to Myrmidons] Mark what I say
Tem I.ii.67 [Prospero to Miranda] I pray thee mark me
Tem I.ii.117 [Prospero to Miranda, of his brother] Mark his condition and th'event
Tem II.i.174 [Gonzalo to Alonso] do you mark me, sir?
Tem V.i.267 [Prospero to the lords, of Stephano, Trinculo, and Caliban] Mark but the badges of these men
TG II.iii.28 [Launce alone, of his sister] Mark the moan she makes
TG IV.iv.34 [Launce alone, to his dog] Did not I bid thee still mark me and do as I do?
Tim III.iv.23 [Lucius's Servant to all] Mark how strange it shows / Timon in this should pay more than he owes
Tit II.iii.20 [Tamora to Aaron, of the hounds] Let us sit down and mark their yellowing noise
Tit III.i.34 [Titus to Lucius, of the tribunes hearing him] If they did hear, / They would not mark me; if they did mark, / They would not pity me
Tit III.i.95 [Titus to Marcus] I stand as one upon a rock / Environed with a wilderness of sea, / Who marks the waxing tide grow wave by wave
Tit III.i.143 [Titus to Marcus, of Lavinia] Mark, Marcus, mark! I understand her signs
TN II.iv.43 [Orsino to Viola as Cesario, of a song] Mark it
TN II.v.191 [Maria to Sir Toby and Sir Andrew, of Malvolio] mark his first approach before my lady
TNK II.ii.72 [First Countryman to other Countrymen, of Arcite] This fellow has a vengeance trick o'th' hip; / Mark how his body's made for't
TNK II.iv.23 [Pirithous to Hippolyta, of disguised Arcite] Mark how his virtue, like a hidden sun, / Breaks through his baser garments
TNK III.v.17 [Schoolmaster to Countrymen] I fling my cap up - mark there!
TNK III.v.94 [Schoolmaster to Countrymen] And mark your cue
TNK IV.iii.26 [Gaoler's Daughter to Gaoler, of Palamon] then let him mark me
TS I.i.251 [stage direction, of Sly and Page watching the play] They sit and mark
TS I.i.163 [Tranio to Lucentio] you looked so longly on the maid, / Perhaps you marked not what's the pith of all
TS I.i.168 [Tranio to Lucentio] Marked you not how her sister / Began to scold
TS IV.ii.5 [Hortensio as Licio to Tranio as Lucentio] Stand by and mark the manner of his teaching
Ven 457 [of Venus and Adonis' expression] This ill presage advisedly she marketh
Ven 680 [Venus to Adonis] when thou hast on foot the purblind hare, / Mark the poor wretch ... / How he outruns the wind
Ven 835 [Venus, of the echoes] She, marking them, begins a wailing note
WT I.ii.408 [Camillo to Polixenes] mark my counsel
WT II.i.65 [Leontes to all, of Hermione] Look on her, mark her well
WT II.iii.169 [Leontes to Antigonus, of the task to be done] Mark and perform it, see'st thou?
WT IV.iv.414 [Florizel to Shepherd] Mark our contract
WT IV.iv.428 [Polixenes to Florizel] Mark thou my words!
WT V.i.64 [Paulina to Leontes, of Hermione] Were I the ghost that walked, I'd bid you mark / Her eye, and tell me for what dull part in't / You chose her
WT V.i.232 [Leontes to all] follow me, / And mark what way I make
WT V.iii.118 [Paulina to Leontes] Mark a little while
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