Glossary

Select headwordChoose sense from the list below
mace
Machiavel
machination
machine
maculate
maculation
mad
madam
mad-bred
madcap
madded
madding
made
madonna
madrigal
maggot-pie
magic
magistrate
magnanimious
magnanimity
magnanimous
magni
magnificent
magnifico
maid
maiden
maidenhead
maidhood
maid-pale
mail
mailed
maim
maimed
main
main a
main-course
mainly
mainport
mainsail
maintain
main-top
majestical
major
majority
make
makeless
make-peace
making
malady of France
malapert
malcontent
male
malediction
malefaction
malice
malicious
maliciously
malign
malignancy
malkin
mallard
mallecho
mallow
malmsey
malmsey-nose
malthorse
maltworm
mammer
mammet
mammock
man
man at arms
man of wax
manage
manager
mandate
mandragora
mandrake
man-entered
mangle
manhood
manifest
manifested
manifoldly
manikin
mankind
manly
manner
mannerly
mannish
man-of-arms
manor
man-queller
mansion
mansionry
mantle
mantled
manu
many
many a day, for this
map
mappery
mar
marble
marbled
marcantant
march
March-chick
marchpane
mare
margent
mark
mark a
mark b
market
market-man
marking
markman
marl
marmoset
married
marring
marrow
marry
marshal
mart
martial
martialist
martlemas
martlet
martyr
martyred
marvel
marvellous
Mary-bud
masculine
mash
mask
masoned
masonry
masque
masquing
mass
massy
mast
master
master-cord
masterdom
masterless
masterly
mastership
mastic
match
mate
mate and make
mated
material
matin
matron
matter
mattock
mature
maugre
maund
maw
may
maying
maze
mazed
mazzard
me
me pompae
meacock
mead
meagre
meal
mealy
mean
mean a
mean-apparelled
mean-born
meander
meaner
meanest
meaning
meanly
measles
measurable
measure
measuring
meat
mechanic
mechanical
medal
meddle
meddling
medice
medicinable
medicine
medicine a
medicine potable
meditance
meditate
meditation
medlar
meed
meet
meetly
meetness
meiny
melancholy
mell
mellowed
melting
member
memento
memorial
memorize
memory
mend
mended
merchandise
merchant
merchant-marring
mercy
mere
mered
merely
meridian
merit
mermaid
merry
mervailous
mess
message, of
messenger
met
metal
metal of India
metamorphose
metamorphosed
metaphysical
mete
meteor
mete-yard
metheglin
methinks
method
methought
metre
mettle
mew
mewl
micher
miching
mickle
microcosm
middle earth
mid-season
mighty
milch
milch-kine
militarist
milk-livered
milk-pap
milky
millioned
mill-sixpence
mimic
mince
minced
mincing
mind
minded
mine
mineral
mingle
minikin
minimus
minion
minister
minnow
minority
minstrel
minstrelsy
minute
minute-jack
minutely
mirable
miracle
mire
mirror
mirth
misadventure
misadventured
Misanthropos
misbecome
misbecomingly
misbegot
misbegotten
miscall
miscarry
mischance
mischief
mischievous
misconster
misconstruction
miscreant
miscreate
misdemean
misdo
misdoubt
misdread
miser
misery
misgive
misgoverned
misgovernment
misgraffed
mishap
mishaved
mislike
misordered
misplace
misprised
misprision
misprize
misprizing
misproud
misreport
miss
missed
misshapen
mis-sheathe
missing
missingly
missive
misspeak
mist
mistake
mistempered
mistful
misthink
misthought
mistreading
mistrust
mistrustful
misuse
mitigate
mitigation
mo
moan
mobled
mock
mocked, well
mockery
mocking
model
modern
modest
modestly
modesty
modicum
module
moe
moiety
moist
moist star
moldwarp
mole
molest
molestation
mollification
mollis
mome
moment
momentany
monarchize
monarcho
monopoly
monsieur
monster
monstrous
monstruosity
montant
monument
monumental
mood
moody
moody-mad
moon, below the
mooncalf
moonish
moonshine
mop
mope
moped
moping
mopping
moral
moralise
moraller
more
more a
more-having
moreover
morisco
morn
morn-dew
morris
morris, nine men's
morris-pike
morrow
morsel
mort
mortal
mortality
mortally
mortal-staring
mortar-piece
mortgage
mortified
mortifying
mortise
mose in the chine
most
mot
mote
mother
mother-wit
motion
motive
motley
motley-minded
mould
moulten
mount
mountain
mountaineer
mountain-foot
mountain-squire
mountant
mountanto
mountebank
mounted
mounting
mournful
mourningly
mouse
mouse-hunt
mouth
mouthed
mouth-friend
mouth-honour
movable
move
moveable
moved
mover
moving
mow
mowing
moy
much
mud
muddied
muddy
muddy-mettled
muffle
muffled
muleteer
mulled
multiplied
multipotent
multitude
multitudinous
mum
mumble
mumble-news
mummer
mummy
mundane
muniment
mural
murder
murdering-piece
mure
murmur
murrain
murrion
murther
muscadel
muse
muset
mushrump
music
musit
musk-cat
muss
mussel-shell
mustachio
muster
muster-file
mutability
mutation
mute
mutine
mutiny
mutton
mutual
mutuality
mutually
mynheer
mystery
methinks(t), methought(s) (v.)  it seems /seemed to me
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See also...
Frequency count
AC I.iii.6 [Charmian to Cleopatra, of Antony] Madam, methinks, if you did love him dearly
AC III.iii.39 [Cleopatra to Charmian, of the Messenger's description of Octavia] Why, methinks, by him, / This creature's no such thing
AC V.ii.282 [Cleopatra to Iras] methinks I hear / Antony call
AW I.ii.53 [King to all, of Bertram's father] Methinks I hear him now
AW II.i.175 [King to Helena] Methinks in thee some blessed spirit doth speak
AW I.iii.136 [Countess to Helena] When I said ‘a mother’, / Methought you saw a serpent
AW V.iii.199 [King to Diana, of a witness] Methought you said / You saw one here in court
AYL II.v.25 [Jaques to Amiens] when a man thanks me heartily, methinks I have given him a penny and he renders me the beggarly thanks
AYL V.iv.29 [Orlando to Duke Senior, of Rosalind as Ganymede] the first time that I ever saw him / Methought he was a brother to your daughter
CE I.ii.66 [Dromio of Ephesus to Antipholus of Syracuse] Methinks your maw, like mine, should be your clock
CE IV.iv.151 [Dromio of Syracuse to Antipholus of Syracuse, of the Ephesians] Methinks they are such a gentle nation
CE V.i.418 [Dromio of Ephesus to Dromio of Syracuse] Methinks you are my glass, and not my brother
Cor I.iii.30 [Volumnia to Virgilia] Methinks I hear hither your husband's drum
Cor I.iii.33 [Volumnia to Virgilia, of Martius] Methinks I see him stamp thus
Cor I.vi.14 [Cominius to Messenger] Though thou speak'st truth, / Methinks thou speak'st not well
Cor II.iii.151 [Sicinius to Brutus, of Coriolanus and the consulship] He has it now, and by his looks methink / 'Tis warm at's heart
Cor IV.v.160 [Second Servingman to First Servingman, of Coriolanus] He had, sir, a kind of face, methought--I cannot tell how to term it
Cym III.iv.49 [Innogen to Pisanio, as if to Iachimo] Thou then look'dst like a villain: now, methinks, / Thy favour's good enough
Cym V.v.209 [Iachimo to Cymbeline, of Posthumus] Methinks I see him now
Cym V.v.427 [Posthumus to Lucius] as I slept, methought / Great Jupiter, upon his eagle backed, / Appeared to me
E3 II.i.36 [King Edward to Lodowick, of the Countess] When she would talk of peace, methinks her tongue / Commanded war to prison
E3 III.ii.74 [Third Frenchman to all, of the English] Methinks I hear their drums
E3 III.iv.70 [King Edward to all] methinks I hear The dismal charge of trumpets' loud retreat
Ham I.ii.184 [Hamlet to Horatio] My father--methinks I see my father
Ham.I.ii.215 [Horatio to Hamlet, of the Ghost] once methought / It lifted up it head and did address / Itself to motion like as it would speak
Ham I.v.58 [Ghost to Hamlet] But soft, methinks I scent the morning air
Ham III.ii.240 [Gertrude to Hamlet] The lady doth protest too much, methinks
Ham III.ii.386 [Hamlet to Polonius, of the shape of a cloud] Methinks it is like a weasel
Ham V.i.62 [First Clown singing] Methought it was very sweet
Ham V.ii.5 [Hamlet to Horatio] Methought I lay / Worse than the mutines in the bilboes
Ham V.ii.98 [Hamlet to Osrick, of the weather] But yet methinks it is very sultry and hot for my complexion
H4 I.iii.199 [Hotspur to Worcester and Northumberland] methinks it were an easy leap / To pluck bright honour from the pale-faced moon
1H4 III.i.92 [Hotspur to all] Methinks my moiety, north from Burton here, / In quantity equals not one of yours
1H4 IV.ii.66 [Westmorland to Falstaff, of Falstaff's soldiers] methinks they are exceeding poor and bare
2H4 II.iv.22 [Hostess to Doll] methinks now you are in an excellent good temperality
2H4 .II.iv.205 [Hostess to Falstaff, of Pistol] Methought 'a made a shrewd thrust at your belly
2H4 II.ii.77 [Page to Prince Henry, of Bardolph] methought he had made two holes in the ale-wife's petticoat
H5 II.ii.141 [King Henry to Scroop] this revolt of thine, methinks, is like / Another fall of man
H5 III.vii.47 [Constable to Dauphin] methought yesterday your mistress shrewdly shook your back
H5 IV.i.123 [disguised King Henry to all] Methinks I could not die anywhere so contented as in the King's company
H5 IV.iii.32 [King Henry to Westmorland] I would not lose so great an honour / As one man more methinks would share from me / For the best hope I have
1H6 I.ii.48 [Bastard to Charles] Methinks your looks are sad
1H6 I.ii.118 [Reignier to Alen??on] My lord, methinks, is very long in talk
1H6 II.v.99 [Richard to Mortimer] But yet methinks my father's execution / Was nothing less than bloody tyranny
1H6 III.i.54 [Somerset to all, of Winchester] Methinks my lord should be religious
1H6 III.ii.97 [Bedford to all] Methinks I should revive the soldiers' hearts
1H6 IV.i.128 [Gloucester to all, of Vernon and Basset] And you, my lords, methinks you do not well / To bear with their perverse objections
1H6 IV.i.175 [Warwick to Richard] the King / Prettily, methought, did play the orator
H16 IV.vii.27 [Talbot to himself, of John Talbot] He smiles, methinks, as who should say / ‘Had Death been French, then Death had died today’
1H6 V.iii.165 [Suffolk to himself, of wooing Margaret] methinks I could be well content / To be mine own attorney in this case
2H6 I.i.230 [York alone] Methinks the realms of England, France, and Ireland / Bear that proportion to my flesh and blood / As did the fatal brand Althaea burnt / Unto the Prince's heart of Calydon
2H6 I.ii.25 [Gloucester to Duchess] Methought this staff, mine office-badge in court, / Was broke in twain
2H6 I.ii.36 [Duchess to Gloucester] Methought I sat in seat of majesty
2H6 I.iii.6 [Peter to Petitioners, of the Lord Protector] Here a' comes, methinks, and the Queen with him
2H6 I.iv.54 [York to Buckingham, of the Duchess] methinks you watched her well
2H6 II.iv.30 [Duchess to Gloucester] Methinks I should not thus be led along, / Mailed up in shame
2H6 IV.ii.58 [Dick to other rebels, of Cade] methinks he should stand in fear of fire
2H6 IV.viii.43 [Clifford to rebels, of the French] Methinks already in this civil broil / I see them lording it in London streets
3H6 I.i.113 [Richard to King, of Henry being too young to be blamed for losing France] You are old enough now, and yet, methinks, you lose
3H6 II.i.6 [Edward to Richard, of York] had he 'scaped, methinks we should have heard
3H6 II.i.13 [Richard to Edward, of York] Methought he bore him in the thickest troop
3H6 II.i.20 [Richard to Edward, of York] Methinks 'tis prize enough to be his son
3H6 II.i.185 [Richard to Warwick] now methinks I hear great Warwick speak
3H6 II.v.21 [] King alone] Methinks it were a happy life / To be no better than a homely swain
3H6 II.v.100 [King to himself, of the dead son and father] The one his purple blood right well resembles; / The other his pale cheeks, methinks, presenteth
3H6 III.iii.91 [Warwick to Oxford, of losing lands in France] Methinks these peers of France should smile at that
3H6 IV.i.51 [Richard to Edward] And yet methinks your grace hath not done well / To give the heir and daughter of Lord Scales / Unto the brother of your loving bride
3H6 IV.viii.35 [King to Exeter] Methinks the power that Edward hath in field / Should not be able to encounter mine
3H6 V.iv.39 [Prince to all, of the Queen] Methinks a woman of this valiant spirit / Should, if a coward heard her speak these words, / Infuse his breast with magnanimity
H8 II.iv.186 [King Henry to all] methought / I stood not in the smile of heaven
H8 III.ii.297 [Wolsey to all, of Surrey] How much, methinks, I could despise this man
H8 III.ii.387 [Wolsey to Cromwell] I am able now, methinks ... / To endure more miseries
H8 IV.ii.4 [Katherine to Griffith] now, methinks, I feel a little ease
H8 V.i.23 [Lovell to Gardiner] Methinks I could / Cry the amen
JC III.ii.109 [First Plebeian to all, of Antony] Methinks there is much reason in his sayings
JC IV.iii.182 [Messala to Brutus, of not hearing about Portia] That, methinks, is strange
KJ III.iv.169 [Cardinal Pandulph to Lewis the Dauphin] Methinks I see this hurly all on foot
KJ IV.i.13 [Arthur to Hubert] Methinks nobody should be sad but I
KJ IV.iii.140 [Bastard to Hubert] I am amazed, methinks, and lose my way / Among the thorns and dangers of this world
KJ V.ii.64 [Lewis the Dauphin to all, of hearing a trumpet] And even there, methinks, an angel spake
KJ V.v.1 [Lewis the Dauphin to all] The sun of heaven, methought, was loath to set
KL IV.vi.3 [blind Gloucester to disguised Edgar] Methinks the ground is even
KL IV.vi.7 [blind Gloucester to disguised Edgar] Methinks thy voice is altered
KL IV.vi.16 [disguised Edgar to blind Gloucester, of someone halfway down a cliff] Methinks he seems no bigger than his head
KL IV.vi.69 [disguised Edgar to blind Gloucester, of Gloucester's guide] As I stood here below methought his eyes / Were two full moons
KL IV.vi.284 [disguised Edgar to blind Gloucester] Far off methinks I hear the beaten drum
KL IV.vii.64 [Lear to Cordelia and Kent] Methinks I should know you, and know this man
KL V.iii.63 [Regan to Albany] Methinks our pleasure might have been demanded / Ere you had spoke so far
KL V.iii.173 [Albany to Edgar] Methought thy very gait did prophesy / A royal nobleness
LLL I.ii.62 [Armado to Mote] methinks I should outswear Cupid
LLL I.ii.84 [Armado to Mote, of green] to have a love of that colour, methinks Samson had small reason for it
LLL II.i.228 [Boyet to Princess, of the King] Methought all his senses were locked in his eye
LLL V.ii.783 [Princess to King, of agreeing to his love] A time, methinks, too short / To make a world-without-end bargain in
MA I.i.161 [Benedick to Claudio, of Hero] methinks she's too low for a high praise
MA III.ii.15 [Leonato to Benedick] methinks you are sadder
MA III.iv.38 [Beatrice to Hero, of speaking in a ‘sick tune’] I am out of all other tune, methinks
Mac II.ii.35 [Macbeth to Lady Macbeth] Methought I heard a voice cry, ‘Sleep no more!’
Mac IV.ii.70 [Messenger to Lady Macduff] To fright you thus methinks I am too savage
Mac V.v.34 [Messenger to Birnan] I look'd toward Birnan and anon methought / The wood began to move
MM IV.ii.114 [Provost to disguised Duke] Lord Angelo ... awakens me with this unwonted putting on - methinks strangely, for he hath not used it before
MM V.i.492 [Duke to all, of Angelo] Methinks I see a quickening in his eye
MND I.i.3 [Theseus to Hippolyta] O, methinks how slow / This old moon wanes!
MND II.ii.155 [Hermia alone] Methought a serpent ate my heart away
MND III.i.135 [Bottom to Titania, of her loving him] Methinks, mistress, you should have little reason for that
MND III.i.193 [Titania to Fairies] The moon methinks looks with a watery eye
MND IV.i.24 [Bottom to Mustardseed] I must to the barber's ... for methinks I am marvellous hairy about the face
MND IV.i.32 [Bottom to Titania] Methinks I have a great desire to a bottle of hay
MND IV.i.76 [Titania to Oberon] Methought I was enamoured of an ass
MND IV.i.188 [Hermia to all] Methinks I see these things with parted eye
MND IV.i.206 [Bottom to all] Methought I was--there is no man can tell what
MND V.i.179 [Theseus to all, of the players] The wall, methinks, being sensible, should curse again
MND V.i.308 [Hippolyta to all, of Thisbe's passion] Methinks she should not use a long one for such a Pyramus
MV I.iii.66 [Shylock to Antonio] Methought you said you neither lend nor borrow / Upon advantage
MV III.ii.125 [Bassanio to himself, of the eyes in a painting of Portia] Having made one, / Methinks it should have power to steal both his / And leave itself unfurnished
MV IV.i.430 [Portia as Balthasar to Bassanio, of his ring] I will have nothing else but only this, / And now methinks I have a mind to it
MV IV.i.436 [Portia as Balthasar to Bassanio] You taught me first to beg, and now methinks / You teach me how a beggar should be answered
MV V.i.4 [Lorenzo to Jessica] Troilus methinks mounted the Troyan walls
MV V.i.100 [Portia to Nerissa, of music heard at night] Methinks it sounds much sweeter than by day
MV V.i.124 [Portia to Lorenzo] This night methinks is but the daylight sick
MW IV.ii.208 [Mistress Ford to Mistress Page, of their husbands and Falstaff] they'll have him publicly shamed, and methinks there would be no period to the jest
MW IV.iv.21 [Evans to Page, of Falstaff] Methinks there should be terrors in him, that he should not come
MW IV.ii.191 [Mistress Ford to Mistress Page, of Ford beating disguised Falstaff] He beat him most unpitifully, methought
Oth II.i.5 [Montano to all] Methinks the wind does speak aloud at land
Oth II.iii.21 [Iago to Cassio, of Desdemona's eye] Methinks it sounds a parley to provocation
Oth V.ii.100 [Othello to himself] Methinks it should be now a huge eclipse / Of sun and moon
PassP XII.12 [] O, sweet shepherd, hie thee, / For methinks thou stays too long
R2 II.i.31 [John of Gaunt to all] Methinks I am a prophet new-inspired
R2 II.ii.9 [Queen Isabel to Bushy] Yet again methinks / Some unborn sorrow ripe in fortune's womb / Is coming towards me
R2 II.iii.116 [Bolingbroke to York] You are my father; for methinks in you / I see old Gaunt alive
R2 III.iii.54 [Bolingbroke to all] Methinks King Richard and myself should meet / With no less terror than the elements
R2 III.iii.91 [King Richard to Northumberland] Tell Bolingbroke - for yon methinks he stands
R3 I.iv.9 [Clarence to Keeper] Methoughts that I had broken from the Tower
R3 I.iv.18 [Clarence to Keeper] Methought that Gloucester stumbled
R3 I.iv.65 [Keeper to Clarence, of Clarence's dream] I am afraid, methinks, to hear you tell it
R3 II.iv.14 [York to Duchess of York, of growing like a weed] methinks, I would not grow so fast
R3 III.i.76 [Prince Edward to Richard] Methinks the truth should live from age to age
R3 V.iii.205 [King Richard alone] Methought the souls of all that I had murdered / Came to my tent
RJ III.v.55 [Juliet to Romeo] Methinks I see thee, now thou art so low, / As one dead in the bottom of a tomb
RJ IV.iii.28 [Juliet alone, of whether Friar Laurence has given her a poison] And yet methinks it should not
RJ IV.iii.55 [Juliet alone] Methinks I see my cousin's ghost / Seeking out Romeo
Sonn 14.2 [] Not from the stars do I my judgement pluck, / And yet methinks I have astronomy
Sonn 62.5 [] Methinks no face so gracious is as mine
Sonn 104.11 [] your sweet hue, which methinks still doth stand
TC II.iii.19 [Thersites alone, of the Neapolitan bone-ache] that, methinks, is the curse dependent on those that war for a placket
TC III.iii.90 [Achilles to Patroclus, of the lords] who do, methinks, find out / Something not worth in me such rich beholding / As they have often given
Tem II.i.71 [Gonzalo to all] Methinks our garments are now as fresh as when we put them on first in Afric
Tem II.i.210 [Antonio to Sebastian] methinks I see it in thy face, / What thou shouldst be
Tem II.i.274 [Sebastian to Antonio, responding to ‘Do you understand me’] Methinks I do
Tem III.ii.142 [Caliban to Stephano] The clouds methought would open, and show riches / Ready to drop upon me
Tem III.iii.98 [Alonso to all] Methought the billows spoke
TG I.i.41 [Valentine to Proteus] he that is so yoked by a fool, / Methinks should not be chronicled for wise
TG I.ii.90 [Lucetta to Julia, of the music in a letter] And yet methinks I do not like this tune
TG II.iv.201 [Proteus alone] Methinks my zeal to Valentine is cold
TG IV.ii.26 [Host to disguised Julia] methinks you're allycholly
TG IV.iv.76 [disguised Julia to Proteus, of Julia] methinks that she loved you as well / As you do love your lady Silvia
Tim I.i.76 [Painter to Poet, of what is in the painting] This throne, this Fortune, and this hill, methinks, / with one man beckoned from the rest below
Tim I.ii.43 [Apemantus to Timon] I wonder men dare trust themselves with men. / Methinks they should invite them without knives
Tim I.ii.104 [Timon to all] Mine eyes cannot hold out water, methinks
Tim I.ii.222 [Timon to all] Methinks I could deal kingdoms to my friends
Tim I.ii.239 [Apemantus to Timon] Methinks false hearts should never have sound legs.
Tim III.iv.76 [Lucius's Servant to Servilius, of Timon] Methinks he should the sooner pay his debts
Tim IV.iii.505 [Timon to Flavius] Methinks thou art more honest now than wise
Tit V.iii.115 [Lucius to all] methinks I do digress too much, / Citing my worthless praise
TN I.i.21 [Orsino to all, of Olivia] when mine eyes did see Olivia first, / Methought she purged the air of pestilence
TN I.iii.80 [Sir Andrew to Sir Toby] Methinks sometimes I have no more wit than a Christian or an ordinary man has
TN I.v.285 [Olivia alone, of Viola as Cesario] Methinks I feel this youth's perfections
TN II.ii.20 [Viola to herself, of Olivia] She made good view of me, indeed so much / That--methought--her eyes had lost her tongue
TN II.iv.4 [Orsino to all] That old and antique song we heard last night. / Methought it did relieve my passion much
TN III.i.123 [Olivia to Viola as Cesario] Why, then, methinks 'tis time to smile again
TN III.iv.353 [Antonio to all, of Sebastian] to his image, which methought did promise / Most venerable worth, did I devotion
TN III.iv.364 [Viola to herself, of Antonio] Methinks his words do from such passion fly / That he believes himself
TNK II.i.153 [Palamon to Arcite] 'Tis like a beast, methinks. I find the court here
TNK II.i.190 [Emilia to Woman] Of all flowers / Methinks a rose is best
TNK II.iv.21 [Emilia to Hippolyta, of disguised Arcite] His mother was a wondrous handsome woman; / His face methinks goes that way
TNK II.v.23 [Gaoler's Daughter alone] he has not thanked me ... / And that, methinks, is not so well
TNK III.vi.70 [Palamon to Arcite] Methinks this armour's very like that, Arcite, / Thou worest that day the three kings fell, but lighter
TNK III.vi.83 [Arcite to Palamon] Methought I heard a dreadful clap of thunder
TNK IV.i.10 [First Friend to Gaoler] the Duke / Methought stood staggering
TNK IV.i.86 [Wooer to all, of the Gaoler's Daughter] methought she appeared like the fair nymph / That feeds the lake with waters
TNK IV.ii.22 [Emilia alone] Fame and honour, / Methinks, from hence
TNK IV.ii.90 [Pirithous to Theseus, of the description of Arcite's knight] a great deal short, / Methinks, of him that's first with Palamon
TNK IV.ii.121 [Messenger to all, of a knight's freckles] Methinks, / Being so few and well disposed, they show / Great and fine art in Nature
TNK V.ii.25 [Gaoler to Doctor, of his opinion] methinks you are i'th' wrong
TNK V.iii.119 [Theseus to Emilia, of Palamon] His behaviour / So charmed me that methought Alcides was / To him a sow of lead
TS II.i.85 [Baptista to Tranio as Lucentio] methinks you walk like a stranger
TS III.i.86 [Hortensio as Licio alone, of Lucentio as Cambio] Methinks he looks as though he were in love
TS III.ii.92 [Petruchio to all] Gentles, methinks you frown
TS III.ii.139 [Lucentio to Tranio] 'Twere good methinks to steal our marriage
WT I.ii.154 [Leontes to Hermione] Looking on the lines / Of my boy's face, methoughts I did recoil / Twenty-three years
WT I.ii.159 [Leontes to Hermione] How like, methought, I then was to this kernel
WT I.ii.365 [Polixenes to himself] methinks / My favour here begins to warp
WT III.i.5 [Dion to all, of those at the Oracle] the celestial habits--/ Methinks I so should term them
WT IV.iv.133 [Perdita to Florizel] Methinks I play as I have seen them do / In Whitsun pastorals
WT IV.iv.391 [Polixenes to Florizel] Methinks a father / Is at the nuptial of his son a guest / That best becomes the table
WT IV.iv.544 [Camillo to Florizel] Methinks I see / Leontes opening his free arms and weeping / His welcomes forth
WT V.ii.7 [First Gentleman to Autolycus] this methought I heard the shepherd say
WT V.iii.62 [Leontes to himself, on seeing the statue of Hermione] Would I were dead but that methinks already--
WT V.iii.77 [Leontes to Paulina, of the statue of Hermione] Still methinks / There is an air comes from her
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