Glossary

Select headwordChoose sense from the list below
wafer-cake
waft
waftage
wafture
wag
wage
waggish
waggon
waggoner
wagtail
wail
wailful
wain-rope
wainscot
waist
wait
waiting-gentlewoman
wake
waked
waking
walk
wall
wallet
wall-eyed
wall-newt
wan
wand
wandering
waned
wanion, with a
wanny
want
wanting
wanton
wanton a
wantonly
wantonness
want-wit
wappened
war
ward
warden
warder
ware
warm
warn
warp
warped
war-proof
warrant
warranted
warrantise, warrantize
warranty
warren
warrener
wash
washing
waspish-headed
wassail
waste
wasted
wasteful
wasting
watch
watch-case
watcher
watchful
watching
water
water-gall
waterish
water-rug
water-standing
waterwork
watery
wave
wavering
wawl
wax
waxen
waxing
way
ways
wayward
waywarder
waywardness
weak
weak-built
weaken
weal
wealsman
wealth
wean
wear
wearing
weary
weasand, wezand
weather
weather-fend
weaved-up
web and the pin
wedding-dower
wedge
wee away
weed
weedy
week, in by the
ween
weepingly
weeping-ripe
weet
weigh
weighing
weight
weighty
welfare
welked
welkin
well
well met
well said
well to live
well-a-day
well-advised
well-a-near
well-apparelled
well-appointed
well-beseeming
well-breathed
well-compact
well-dealing
well-disposed
well-divided
well-entered
well-favoured
well-forwarning
well-found
well-graced
well-hallowed
well-knit
well-known
well-liking
well-lost
well-minded
well-respected
well-seeming
well-sinewed
well-spoken
well-warranted
well-weighing
well-willer
well-wished
wen
wench
wenching
wenchless
wench-like
wend
weraday
wert
westward
wet
wether
wharf
what
what though
wheak
wheel
wheeling
whe'er
Wheeson
whelk
whelm
whelp
when
whenas
whence
whencesoever
whensoever
where
whereabout
where-through
whet
whether
whetstone
whey-face
whiffler
while
while-ere
whiles
whilst, the
whinyard
whip
whipping-cheer
whipster
whipstock
whir
whirligig
whisper
whist
whistle
whistling
whit
white
whitebeard
white-haired
white-livered
whitely
whither
whiting-time
whitly
whitster
whittle
who
whole
wholesome
wholesome-profitable
whoo-bub
whoop
whooping
whore
whoremaster
whore-masterly
whoremonger
whoreson
wide
wide-chopped
wide-enlarged
wide-skirted
wide-stretched
widow-dolour
widowhood
wield
wife
wight
wild
wilderness
wildfire
wildly
wildness
wile
wilful
wilful-blame
wilful-negligent
wilful-opposite
will
willed
willing
willow
wilt
wimpled
win
winch
Winchester goose
wind
wind a
wind-changing
windgall
winding-sheet
windlass
window
windowed
windows' tops
windring
wind-swift
windy
wing
wing a
winged
wing-led
wink
winking
winter
wintered
winter-ground
winterly
wipe
wisdom
wise
wise woman
wish
wished
wishful
wishtly
wist
wistly
wit
wit a
witch
witching
with
withal
withdraw
wither out
withers
withhold
within
without
without-door
witless
witness
witness a
witnessed
wit-old
wit-snapper
wittily
wittingly
wittol
wittolly
witty
wiving
woe
woeful
wold
wolvish
wolvish-ravening
woman
womanhood
womanly
woman-post
woman-queller
woman-tired
womb
womby
wonder
wondered
wonderful
wondering
wonderingly
wonder-wounded
wondrous
wont
wonted
woo
wood
woodbine
woodcock
wooden
woodman
woof
wooingly
woollen
woolward
woosel
word
work
working
working-day
working-house
workman
workmanly
workyday
world
worldling
worldly
worm
wormwood
worn
worn-out
worried
worse
worship
worshipfully
worst
worsted
wort
worth
worthily
worthless
worthy
wot
would
wound
wounded
woundless
wrack
wrackful
wrack-threatening
wrangle
wrangler
wrangling
wrap
wrastle
wreak
wreakful
wreathe
wrench
wrest
wrested
wretchedness
wring
wringing
wrinkle
wrinkled
writ
write
writhled
written
wroath
wrong
wrong-incensed
wroth
wrought
wry
wry-necked
wit (n.) 1intelligence, wisdom, good sense, mental ability
wit (n.) 2mental sharpness, acumen, quickness, ingenuity
wit (n.) 3reasoning, thinking, deliberation
wit (n.) 4cunning plan, ingenious design
wit (n.) 5mind, brain, thoughts
wit (n.) 6lively person, sharp-minded individual
wit (v.)  know, be aware, realize
wit, to  [legal] that is to say
Choosing a line reference will open up a new page, taking you to that point in the text. This Glossary page will remain open.
See also...
Frequency count
AYL I.ii.44 [Celia to Rosalind] Nature hath given us wit to flout at Fortune
AYL I.ii.85 [Celia to Touchstone] since the little wit that fools have was silenced, the little foolery that wise men have makes a great show
AYL I.ii.97 [Rosalind to Le Beau, responding to his ‘How shall I answer you?’ As wit and fortune will
AYL II.iv.53 [Touchstone to Rosalind as Ganymede] I shall ne'er be ware of mine own wit till I break my shins against it
AYL III.ii.27 [Corin to Touchstone] he that hath learned no wit by nature nor art may complain of good breeding, or comes of a very dull kindred
AYL III.iii.11 [Touchstone to Audrey] a man's good wit
AYL IV.i.77 [Rosalind as Ganymede to Orlando] I should think my honesty ranker than my wit
AYL IV.i.149 [Rosalind as Ganymede to Orlando, of how the real Rosalind would behave] Or else she could not have the wit to do this
CE II.ii.87 [Dromio of Syracuse to Antipholus of Syracuse, of Time] what he hath scanted men in hair he hath given them in wit [and in following lines]
CE II.ii.159 [Antipholus of Syracuse to Luciana] every word by all my wit being scanned, / Wants wit in all one word to understand
Cym I.iii.29 [First Lord to Cloten, of Innogen] I have seen small reflection of her wit
Cym II.i.9 [Second Lord to himself, of Cloten's opponent and Cloten] If his wit had been like him that broke it, it would have run all out
E3 I.ii.130 [King Edward to himself, of the Countess's eye] Which shoots infected poison in my heart, / Beyond repulse of wit or cure of art
Ham II.ii.90 [Polonius to Claudius and Gertrude] since brevity is the soul of wit
Ham II.ii.200 [Hamlet to Polonius, of old men] they have a plentiful lack of wit
Ham III.ii.329 [Hamlet to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern] My wit's diseased [or: sense 5]
2H4 I.ii.208 [Falstaff to Lord Chief Justice, of going to the wars with Prince John] I thank your pretty sweet wit for it
2H4 II.iv.234 [Doll to Falstaff] They say Poins has a good wit
2H4 II.iv.236 [Falstaff to Doll, of Poins] His wit's as thick as Tewkesbury mustard
2H4 IV.iii.85 [Falstaff alone, as if to Prince John, who has promised to speak well of him] I would you had the wit; 'twere better than your dukedom
H5 III.vii.30 [Dauphin to all] the man hath no wit that cannot ... vary deserved praise on my palfrey
H5 III.vii.145 [Constable to all] the men do sympathize with the mastiffs in robustious and rough coming on, leaving their wits with their wives
H5 IV.vii.45 [Fluellen to Gower] Harry Monmouth, being in his right wits and his good judgements
H5 V.ii.25 [Burgundy to all] I have laboured / With all my wits, my pains, and strong endeavours, / To bring your most imperial majesties / Unto this bar and royal interview
2H6 I.i.30 [Queen to King, of greeting him] With ruder terms, such as my wit affords
2H6 III.i.232 [Queen to all, of eliminating Gloucester]herein I judge mine own wit good
3H6 III.ii.85 [Edward to himself, of Lady Grey] Her words doth show her wit incomparable [or: sense 2]
H8 II.iv.47 [Queen Katherine to King Henry, of his father] of an excellent / And unmatched wit and judgement
H8 III.i.72 [Queen Katherine to Wolsey and Campeius] how to make ye suddenly an answer / In such a point of weight, so near mine honour ... with my weak wit
H8 III.i.177 [Queen Katherine to and of Wolsey and Campeius] You know I am a woman, lacking wit / To make a seemly answer to such persons
H8 V.iv.47 [Man to Porter, of a man in the crowd] There was a haberdasher's wife of small wit near him
KL I.iv.160 [Fool to Lear] Thou hadst little wit in thy bald crown when thou gavest thy golden one away
KL I.iv.183 [Fool to Lear] Thou hast pared thy wit o'both sides and left nothing i'the middle
KL I.v.11 [Fool to Lear] Then I prithee be merry. Thy wit shall not go slip-shod
KL II.iv.41 [disguised Kent to Lear] Having more man than wit about me
LLL I.ii.85 [Armado to Mote, of Samson's lady] He surely affected her for her wit
LLL I.ii.91 [Mote to Armado] My father's wit and my mother's tongue assist me!
LLL I.ii.169 [Armado alone, of Samson] he had a very good wit
LLL I.ii.177 [Armado alone] Devise, wit; write, pen
LLL II.i.69 [Rosaline to Princess, of Berowne] His eye begets occasion for his wit
LLL IV.i.50 [Costard to Princess] An your waist, mistress, were as slender as my wit, / One o'these maids' girdles for your waist should be fit
LLL IV.ii.34 [Dull to Holofernes and Nathaniel] You two are book-men - can you tell me by your wit / What was a month old at Cain's birth that's not five weeks old as yet?
LLL IV.iii.98 [Berowne to Dumaine] Once more I'll mark how love can vary wit
LLL V.ii.69 [Princess to all] None are so surely caught, when they are catched, / As wit turned fool
LLL V.ii.76 [Maria to all] Folly in fools bears not so strong a note / As foolery in the wise when wit doth dote, / Since all the power thereof it doth apply / To prove, by wit, worth in simplicity [first instance]
LLL V.ii.269 [Proncess to all, of the lords] O poverty in wit, kingly-poor flout!
LLL V.ii.484 [Berowne to Costard] Welcome, pure wit!
Luc 153 [] we do neglect / The thing we have, and all for want of wit / Make something nothing by augmenting it
Luc 964 [] One poor retiring minute in an age / Would purchase thee a thousand thousand friends, / Lending him wit that to bad debtors lends
Luc 1809 [] Brutus ... / Began to clothe his wit in state and pride
MA I.i.62 [Beatrice to Leonato, of Benedick] if he have wit enough to keep himself warm, let him bear it for a difference between himself and his horse
MA I.ii.15 [Leonato to Antonio, of the news that the Duke loves Hero] Hath the fellow any wit that told you this?
MA II.i.116 [masked Beatrice to masked Benedick] I had my good wit out of the ‘Hundred Merry Tales‘
MA II.i.126 [masked Beatrice to masked Benedick, of Benedick] the commendation is not in his wit, but in his villainy
MA II.iii.184 [Don Pedro to Claudio and Leonato, of Benedick] He doth, indeed, show some sparks that are like wit
MA II.iii.227 [Benedick alone, of Beatrice] it is no addition to her wit, nor no great argument of her folly, for I will be horribly in love with her
MA III.i.89 [Ursula to Hero, of Beatrice] She cannot be so much without true judgement - / Having so swift and excellent a wit / As she is prized to have
MA III.v.33 [Dogberry to Verges] When the age is in, the wit is out
MA III.v.56 [Dogberry to Verges] We will spare for no wit
MM II.i.256 [Elbow to Escalus, of men able to serve as constable] few of any wit in such matters
MM II.ii.127 [Isabella to Angelo] Great men may jest with saints: 'tis wit in them
MM V.i.360 [Duke to Angelo] Hast thou or word, or wit, or impudence / That yet can do thee office?
MND III.i.127 [Bottom to himself, of a cuckoo] who would set his wit to so foolish a bird?
MND III.i.141 [Bottom to Titania] if I had wit enough to get out of this wood, I have enough to serve mine own turn
MND IV.i.204 [Bottom to all] I have had a dream past the wit of man to say what dream it was
MND IV.ii.9 [Flute to all, of Bottom] he hath simply the best wit of any handicraft man in Athens
MV II.i.18 [Portia to Morocco] my father ... hedged me by his wit to yield myself / His wife who wins me by that means I told you
MV II.ix.80 [Portia to Nerissa, of the suitors] When they do choose, / They have the wisdom by their wit to lose
MV III.v.41 [Lorenzo to Jessica, of Launcelot] I think the best grace of wit will shortly turn into silence
MV III.v.52 [Lorenzo to Launcelot] Wilt thou show the whole wealth of thy wit in an instant?
MV IV.i.127 [Shylock to Gratiano, responding to ‘Can no prayers pierce thee?’] No, none that thou hast wit enough to make
MV IV.i.141 [Shylock to Gratiano] Repair thy wit, good youth, or it will fall / To cureless ruin
MW I.iii.86 [Pistol to Nym, of how he will be revenged] With wit or steel?
MW IV.v.56 [Falstaff to Host, of a wise woman] one that hath taught me more wit than ever I learned before in my life
MW V.v.127 [Falstaff to all] See now how wit may be made a Jack-a-Lent when 'tis upon ill employment
Oth I.i.136 [Roderigo to Brabantio, of Desdemona] her duty, beauty, wit, and fortunes
Oth II.i.128 [Iago to and of Desdemona] If she be fair and wise, fairness and wit, / The one's for use, the other useth it
Oth II.iii.357 [Roderigo to Iago] I shall ... with no money at all, and a little more wit, return again to Venice
Oth III.iii.463 [Iago to Othello] Iago doth give up / The execution of his wit, hands, heart, / To wronged Othello's service
Oth III.iv.21 [Clown to Desdemona, of fetching Cassio] To do this is within the compass of man's wit, and therefore I will attempt the doing of it
Oth IV.i.121 [Cassio to Iago] Prithee bear some charity to my wit
Oth IV.ii.145 [Emilia to Iago, of a rogue] Some such squire he was / That turned your wit the seamy side without
Oth IV.ii.211 [Iago to Roderigo] your suspicion is not without wit and judgement
Per Chorus.I.12 [Gower to audience] you, born in these latter times / When wit's more ripe
R2 II.i.28 [York to John of Gaunt] all too late comes counsel to be heard / Where will doth mutiny with wit's regard
R3 III.i.86 [Prince Edward to Richard, of Julius Caesar] With what his valour did enrich his wit, / His wit set down to make his valour live
RJ I.i.209 [Romeo to Benvolio, of Rosaline] She hath Dian's wit
RJ I.iii.43 [Nurse to Lady Capulet, quoting her husband talking to baby Juliet] Thou wilt fall backward when thou hast more wit
RJ I.iv.49 [Romeo to Benvolio] we mean well in going to this masque, / But 'tis no wit to go
RJ III.iii.122 [Friar Laurence to Romeo] thou shamest thy shape, thy love, thy wit [and in the following]
RJ III.v.73 [Lady Capulet to Juliet] much of grief shows still some want of wit
Sonn 23.14 [] To hear with eyes belongs to love's fine wit [i.e. insight]
Sonn 37.5 [] beauty, birth, or wealth, or wit
TC I.i.48 [Pandarus to Troilus] I will not dispraise your sister Cassandra's wit
TC I.ii.87 [Pandarus to Cressida, of Troilus] Hector shall not have his wit this year
TC I.ii.190 [Pandarus to Cressida, of Antenor] He has a shrewd wit
TC I.ii.261 [Cressida to Pandarus, of how she will defend herself] upon my wit to defend my wiles
TC I.iii.74 [Agamemnon to Ulysses] When rank Thersites opes his mastic jaws / We shall hear music, wit, and oracle
TC II.i.16 [Thersites to Ajax] I shall sooner rail thee into wit and holiness
TC II.i.46 [Thersites to Ajax] thou art bought and sold among those of any wit, like a barbarian slave
TC II.i.67 [Thersites to Achilles, of Ajax] lo, what modicums of wit he utters [and in the following]
TC II.iii.13 [Thersites alone] Mercury, lose all the serpentine craft of thy caduceus, if thou take not that little little, less than little wit from them that they have!
TC II.iii.214 [Ulysses to himself] Wit would be out of fashion
TC III.ii.148 [Cressida to Troilus] Where is my wit?
TC III.iii.171 [Ulysses to all] beauty, wit, / High birth ... are subjects all / To envious and calumniating time
TC III.iii.255 [Thersites to Achilles, of Ajax] who should say there were wit in his head, an 'twould out
TC V.i.54 [Thersites alone] wit larded with malice, and malice forced with wit
TG I.i.35 [Valentine to Proteus] a folly bought with wit, / Or else a wit by folly vanquished [and in the following]
TG II.iv.37 [Valentine to Silvia] Sir Thurio borrows his wit from your ladyship's looks
TG II.vi.12 [Proteus alone] And he wants wit that wants resolved will / To learn his wit t'exchange the bad for better
TG.II.vi.43 [Proteus alone] Love, lend me wings to make my purpose swift, / As thou hast lent me wit to plot this drift!
TG III.i.261 [Launce alone] I am but a fool, look you, and yet I have the wit to think my master is a kind of a knave
TG III.i.343 [Speed to Launce, of Launce's lady] She hath more hair than wit [and in the following]
TG IV.iv.13 [Launce alone, of his dog] If I had not had more wit than he
Tim II.ii.120 [Fool to Varro's Servant] As much foolery as I have, so much wit thou lackest
Tit II.i.10 [Aaron alone, of Tamora] Upon her wit doth earthly honour wait
Tit II.i.26 [Demetrius to Chiron] thy years want wit, thy wit wants edge / And manners to intrude where I am graced
Tit II.i.120 [Aaron to Chiron and Demetrius] our Empress with her sacred wit / To villainy and vengeance consecrate, / Will we acquaint with all that we intend
Tit II.iii.1 [Aaron alone] He that had wit would think that I had none, / To bury so much gold under a tree
TN I.iii.81 [Sir Andrew to Sir Toby] sometimes I have no more wit than a Christian or an ordinary man has
TN I.iii.104 [Sir Toby to Sir Andrew, of Olivia] she'll not match above her degree, neither in estate, years, nor wit
TN I.v.29 [Feste to himself] Wit, an't be thy will, put me into good fooling
TN II.iii.86 [Malvolio to all] Have ye no wit, manners, nor honesty
TN II.iii.131 [Maria to all, of Malvolio] If I do not ... make him a common recreation, do not think I have wit enough to lie straight in my bed
TN III.i.59 [Viola as Cesario alone, of Feste] This fellow is wise enough to play the fool; / And to do that well craves a kind of wit
TN III.i.66 [Viola as Cesario alone] wise men, folly-fallen, quite taint their wit [i.e. harm their reputation for talking sense]
TN III.i.129 [Olivia to Viola as Cesario] when wit and youth is come to harvest, / Your wife is like to reap a proper man
TN III.i.149 [Olivia to Viola as Cesario] Nor wit nor reason can my passion hide [i.e. common sense]
TN V.i.208 [Sebastian to Olivia] I have hurt your kinsman. / But had it been the brother of my blood / I must have done no less, with wit and safety
TNK II.v.12 [Gaoler's Daughter alone, of Palamon] I love him beyond love, and beyond reason, / Or wit, or safety
TS Induction.2.76 [Second Servingman to Sly] O, how we joy to see your wit restored!
TS II.i.48 [Petruchio to Baptista, of Katherina] hearing of her beauty and her wit
Tim I.i.237 [Apemantus to Timon] That I had no angry wit to be a lord [unclear meaning]
Ven 472 [of Venus] Fair fall the wit that can so well defend her!
Ven 690 [] Danger deviseth shifts; wit waits on fear
Ven 1008 [] Grief hath two tongues, and never woman yet / Could rule them both without ten women's wit
WT II.ii.52 [Paulina to Emilia] I'll use that tongue I have. If wit flow from't ... I shall do good
--%>