Henry VIII

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Original text
Act V, Scene I
Enter Gardiner Bishop of Winchester, a Page with a
Torch before him, met by Sir Thomas Louell.

Gard.
It's one a clocke Boy, is't not.

Boy.
It hath strooke.

Gard.
These should be houres for necessities,
Not for delights: Times to repayre our Nature
With comforting repose, and not for vs
To waste these times. Good houre of night Sir Thomas:
Whether so late?

Lou.
Came you from the King, my Lord?

Gar.
I did Sir Thomas, and left him at Primero
With the Duke of Suffolke.

Lou.
I must to him too
Before he go to bed. Ile take my leaue.

Gard.
Not yet Sir Thomas Louell: what's the matter?
It seemes you are in hast: and if there be
No great offence belongs too't, giue your Friend
Some touch of your late businesse: Affaires that walke
(As they say Spirits do) at midnight, haue
In them a wilder Nature, then the businesse
That seekes dispatch by day.

Lou.
My Lord, I loue you;
And durst commend a secret to your eare
Much waightier then this worke. The Queens in Labor
They say in great Extremity, and fear'd
Shee'l with the Labour, end.

Gard.
The fruite she goes with
I pray for heartily, that it may finde
Good time, and liue: but for the Stocke Sir Thomas,
I wish it grubb'd vp now.

Lou.
Me thinkes I could
Cry the Amen, and yet my Conscience sayes
Shee's a good Creature, and sweet-Ladie do's
Deserue our better wishes.

Gard.
But Sir, Sir,
Heare me Sir Thomas, y'are a Gentleman
Of mine owne way. I know you Wise, Religious,
And let me tell you, it will ne're be well,
'Twill not Sir Thomas Louell, tak't of me,
Till Cranmer, Cromwel, her two hands, and shee
Sleepe in their Graues.

Louell.
Now Sir, you speake of two
The most remark'd i'th'Kingdome: as for Cromwell,
Beside that of the Iewell-House, is made Master
O'th'Rolles, and the Kings Secretary. Further Sir,
Stands in the gap and Trade of moe Preferments,
With which the Lime will loade him. Th'Archbyshop
Is the Kings hand, and tongue, and who dare speak
One syllable against him?

Gard.
Yes, yes, Sir Thomas,
There are that Dare, and I my selfe haue ventur'd
To speake my minde of him: and indeed this day,
Sir (I may tell it you) I thinke I haue
Incenst the Lords o'th'Councell, that he is
(For so I know he is, they know he is)
A most Arch-Heretique, a Pestilence
That does infect the Land: with which, they moued
Haue broken with the King, who hath so farre
Giuen eare to our Complaint, of his great Grace,
And Princely Care, fore-seeing those fell Mischiefes,
Our Reasons layd before him, hath commanded
To morrow Morning to the Councell Boord
He be conuented. He's a ranke weed Sir Thomas,
And we must root him out. From your Affaires
I hinder you too long: Good night, Sir Thomas.

Lou.
Many good nights, my Lord, I rest your seruant.
Exit Gardiner and Page.
Enter King and Suffolke.

King.
Charles, I will play no more to night,
My mindes not on't, you are too hard for me.

Suff.
Sir, I did neuer win of you before.

King.
But little Charles,
Nor shall not when my Fancies on my play.
Now Louel, from the Queene what is the Newes.

Lou.
I could not personally deliuer to her
What you commanded me, but by her woman,
I sent your Message, who return'd her thankes
In the great'st humblenesse, and desir'd your Highnesse
Most heartily to pray for her.

King.
What say'st thou? Ha?
To pray for her? What, is she crying out?

Lou.
So said her woman, and that her suffrance made
Almost each pang, a death.

King.
Alas good Lady.

Suf.
God safely quit her of her Burthen, and
With gentle Trauaile, to the gladding of
Your Highnesse with an Heire.

King.
'Tis midnight Charles,
Prythee to bed, and in thy Prayres remember
Th'estate of my poore Queene. Leaue me alone,
For I must thinke of that, which company
Would not be friendly too.

Suf.
I wish your Highnesse
A quiet night, and my good Mistris will
Remember in my Prayers.

King.
Charles good night.
Exit Suffolke.
Enter Sir Anthony Denny.
Well Sir, what followes?

Den.
Sir, I haue brought my Lord the Arch-byshop,
As you commanded me.

King.
Ha? Canterbury?

Den.
I my good Lord.

King.
'Tis true: where is he Denny?

Den.
He attends your Highnesse pleasure.

King.
Bring him to Vs.

Lou.
This is about that, which the Byshop spake,
I am happily come hither.
Enter Cranmer and Denny.

King.
Auoyd the Gallery.
Louel seemes to stay.
Ha? I haue said. Be gone.
What?
Exeunt Louell and Denny.

Cran.
I am fearefull: Wherefore frownes he thus?
'Tis his Aspect of Terror. All's not well.

King.
How now my Lord? / You do desire to know
wherefore / I sent for you.

Cran.
It is my dutie
T'attend your Highnesse pleasure.

King.
Pray you arise
My good and gracious Lord of Canterburie:
Come, you and I must walke a turne together:
I haue Newes to tell you. / Come, come, giue me your hand.
Ah my good Lord, I greeue at what I speake,
And am right sorrie to repeat what followes.
I haue, and most vnwillingly of late
Heard many greeuous. I do say my Lord
Greeuous complaints of you; which being consider'd,
Haue mou'd Vs, and our Councell, that you shall
This Morning come before vs, where I know
You cannot with such freedome purge your selfe,
But that till further Triall, in those Charges
Which will require your Answer, you must take
Your patience to you, and be well contented
To make your house our Towre: you, a Brother of vs
It fits we thus proceed, or else no witnesse
Would come against you.

Cran.
I humbly thanke your Highnesse,
And am right glad to catch this good occasion
Most throughly to be winnowed, where my Chaffe
And Corne shall flye asunder. For I know
There's none stands vnder more calumnious tongues,
Then I my selfe, poore man.

King.
Stand vp, good Canterbury,
Thy Truth, and thy Integrity is rooted
In vs thy Friend. Giue me thy hand, stand vp,
Prythee let's walke. Now by my Holydame,
What manner of man are you? My Lord, I look'd
You would haue giuen me your Petition, that
I should haue tane some paines, to bring together
Your selfe, and your Accusers, and to haue heard you
Without indurance further.

Cran.
Most dread Liege,
The good I stand on, is my Truth and Honestie:
If they shall faile, I with mine Enemies
Will triumph o're my person, which I waigh not,
Being of those Vertues vacant. I feare nothing
What can be said against me.

King.
Know you not
How your state stands i'th'world, with the whole world?
Your Enemies are many, and not small; their practises
Must beare the same proportion, and not euer
The Iustice and the Truth o'th'question carries
The dew o'th'Verdict with it; at what ease
Might corrupt mindes procure, Knaues as corrupt
To sweare against you: Such things haue bene done.
You are Potently oppos'd, and with a Malice
Of as great Size. Weene you of better lucke,
I meane in periur'd Witnesse, then your Master,
Whose Minister you are, whiles heere he liu'd
Vpon this naughty Earth? Go too, go too,
You take a Precepit for no leape of danger,
And woe your owne destruction.

Cran.
God, and your Maiesty
Protect mine innocence, or I fall into
The trap is laid for me.

King.
Be of good cheere,
They shall no more preuaile, then we giue way too:
Keepe comfort to you, and this Morning see
You do appeare before them. If they shall chance
In charging you with matters, to commit you:
The best perswasions to the contrary
Faile not to vse, and with what vehemencie
Th'occasion shall instruct you. If intreaties
Will render you no remedy, this Ring
Deliuer them, and your Appeale to vs
There make before them. Looke, the goodman weeps:
He's honest on mine Honor. Gods blest Mother,
I sweare he is true-hearted, and a soule
None better in my Kingdome. Get you gone,
And do as I haue bid you.
Exit Cranmer.
He ha's strangled
his Language in his teares.
Enter Olde Lady.

Gent.
within.
Come backe: what meane you?

Lady.
Ile not come backe, the tydings that I bring
Will make my boldnesse, manners. Now good Angels
Fly o're thy Royall head, and shade thy person
Vnder their blessed wings.

King.
Now by thy lookes
I gesse thy Message. Is the Queene deliuer'd?
Say I, and of a boy.

Lady.
I, I my Liege,
And of a louely Boy: the God of heauen
Both now, and euer blesse her: 'Tis a Gyrle
Promises Boyes heereafter. Sir, your Queen
Desires your Visitation, and to be
Acquainted with this stranger; 'tis as like you,
As Cherry, is to Cherry.

King.
Louell.

Lou.
Sir.

King.
Giue her an hundred Markes. / Ile to the Queene.
Exit King.

Lady.
An hundred Markes? By this light, Ile ha more.
An ordinary Groome is for such payment.
I will haue more, or scold it out of him.
Said I for this, the Gyrle was like to him? Ile
Haue more, or else vnsay't: and now, while 'tis hot,
Ile put it to the issue.
Exit Ladie.
Original text
Act V, Scene II
Enter Cranmer, Archbyshop of Canterbury.

Cran.
I hope I am not too late, and yet the Gentleman
That was sent to me from the Councell, pray'd me
To make great hast. All fast? What meanes this? Hoa?
Who waites there?
Enter Keeper.
Sure you know me?

Keep.
Yes, my Lord:
But yet I cannot helpe you.

Cran.
Why?
Enter Doctor Buts.

Keep.
Your Grace
must waight till you be call'd for.

Cran.
So.

Buts.
This is a Peere of Malice: I am glad
I came this way so happily. The King
Shall vnderstand it presently.
Exit Buts

Cran.
'Tis Buts.
The Kings Physitian, as he past along
How earnestly he cast his eyes vpon me:
Pray heauen he sound not my disgrace: for certaine
This is of purpose laid by some that hate me,
(God turne their hearts, I neuer sought their malice)
To quench mine Honor; they would shame to make me
Wait else at doore: a fellow Councellor
'Mong Boyes, Groomes, and Lackeyes. / But their pleasures
Must be fulfill'd, and I attend with patience.
Enter the King, and Buts, at a Windowe aboue.

Buts.
Ile shew your Grace the strangest sight.

King.
What's that Buts?

Butts.
I thinke your Highnesse saw this many a day.

Kin.
Body a me: where is it?

Butts.
There my Lord:
The high promotion of his Grace of Canterbury,
Who holds his State at dore 'mongst Purseuants,
Pages, and Foot-boyes.

Kin.
Ha? 'Tis he indeed.
Is this the Honour they doe one another?
'Tis well there's one aboue 'em yet; I had thought
They had parted so much honesty among 'em,
At least good manners; as not thus to suffer
A man of his Place, and so neere our fauour
To dance attendance on their Lordships pleasures,
And at the dore too, like a Post with Packets:
By holy Mary (Butts) there's knauery;
Let 'em alone, and draw the Curtaine close:
We shall heare more anon.

Original text
Act V, Scene III
A Councell Table brought in with Chayres and Stooles, and
placed vnder the State. Enter Lord Chancellour, places
himselfe at the vpper end of the Table, on the left hand:
A Seate being left void aboue him, as for Canterburies.
Seate. Duke of Suffolke, Duke of Norfolke, Surrey, Lord
Chamberlaine, Gardiner, seat themselues in Order on
each side. Cromwell at lower end, as Secretary.

Chan.
Speake to the businesse, M. Secretary;
Why are we met in Councell?

Crom.
Please your Honours,
The chiefe cause concernes his Grace of Canterbury.

Gard.
Ha's he had knowledge of it?

Crom.
Yes.

Norf.
Who waits there?

Keep.
Without my Noble Lords?

Gard.
Yes.

Keep.
My Lord Archbishop:
And ha's done halfe an houre to know your pleasures.

Chan.
Let him come in.

Keep.
Your Grace may enter now.
Cranmer approches the Councell Table.

Chan.
My good Lord Archbishop, I'm very sorry
To sit heere at this present, and behold
That Chayre stand empty: But we all are men
In our owne natures fraile, and capable
Of our flesh, few are Angels; out of which frailty
And want of wisedome, you that best should teach vs,
Haue misdemean'd your selfe, and not a little:
Toward the King first, then his Lawes, in filling
The whole Realme, by your teaching & your Chaplaines
(For so we are inform'd) with new opinions,
Diuers and dangerous; which are Heresies;
And not reform'd, may proue pernicious.

Gard.
Which Reformation must be sodaine too
My Noble Lords; for those that tame wild Horses,
Pace 'em not in their hands to make 'em gentle;
But stop their mouthes with stubborn Bits & spurre'em,
Till they obey the mannage. If we suffer
Out of our easinesse and childish pitty
To one mans Honour, this contagious sicknesse;
Farewell all Physicke: and what followes then?
Commotions, vprores, with a generall Taint
Of the whole State; as of late dayes our neighbours,
The vpper Germany can deerely witnesse:
Yet freshly pittied in our memories.

Cran.
My good Lords; Hitherto, in all the Progresse
Both of my Life and Office, I haue labour'd,
And with no little study, that my teaching
And the strong course of my Authority,
Might goe one way, and safely; and the end
Was euer to doe well: nor is there liuing,
(I speake it with a single heart, my Lords)
A man that more detests, more stirres against,
Both in his priuate Conscience, and his place,
Defacers of a publique peace then I doe:
Pray Heauen the King may neuer find a heart
With lesse Allegeance in it. Men that make
Enuy, and crooked malice, nourishment;
Dare bite the best. I doe beseech your, Lordships,
That in this case of Iustice, my Accusers,
Be what they will, may stand forth face to face,
And freely vrge against me.

Suff.
Nay, my Lord,
That cannot be; you are a Counsellor,
And by that vertue no man dare accuse you.

Gard.
My Lord, because we haue busines of more moment,
We will be short with you. 'Tis his Highnesse pleasure
And our consent, for better tryall of you,
From hence you be committed to the Tower,
Where being but a priuate man againe,
You shall know many dare accuse you boldly,
More then (I feare) you are prouided for.

Cran.
Ah my good Lord of Winchester: I thanke you,
You are alwayes my good Friend, if your will passe,
I shall both finde your Lordship, Iudge and Iuror,
You are so mercifull. I see your end,
'Tis my vndoing. Loue and meekenesse, Lord
Become a Churchman, better then Ambition:
Win straying Soules with modesty againe,
Cast none away: That I shall cleere my selfe,
Lay all the weight ye can vpon my patience,
I make as little doubt as you doe conscience,
In doing dayly wrongs. I could say more,
But reuerence to your calling, makes me modest.

Gard.
My Lord, my Lord, you are a Sectary,
That's the plaine truth; your painted glosse discouers
To men that vnderstand you, words and weaknesse.

Crom.
My Lord of Winchester, y'are a little,
By your good fauour, too sharpe; Men so Noble,
How euer faultly, yet should finde respect
For what they haue beene: 'tis a cruelty,
To load a falling man.

Gard.
Good M. Secretary,
I cry your Honour mercie; you may worst
Of all this Table say so.

Crom.
Why my Lord?

Gard.
Doe not I know you for a Fauourer
Of this new Sect? ye are not sound.

Crom.
Not sound?

Gard.
Not sound I say.

Crom.
Would you were halfe so honest:
Mens prayers then would seeke you, not their feares.

Gard.
I shall remember this bold Language.

Crom.
Doe.
Remember your bold life too.

Cham.
This is too much;
Forbeare for shame my Lords.

Gard.
I haue done.

Crom.
And I.

Cham.
Then thus for you my Lord, it stands agreed
I take it, by all voyces: That forthwith,
You be conuaid to th'Tower a Prisoner;
There to remaine till the Kings further pleasure
Be knowne vnto vs: are you all agreed Lords.

All.
We are.

Cran.
Is there no other way of mercy,
But I must needs to th'Tower my Lords?

Gard.
What other,
Would you expect? You are strangely troublesome:
Let some o'th'Guard be ready there.
Enter the Guard.

Cran.
For me?
Must I goe like a Traytor thither?

Gard.
Receiue him,
And see him safe i'th'Tower.

Cran.
Stay good my Lords,
I haue a little yet to say. Looke there my Lords,
By vertue of that Ring, I take my cause
Out of the gripes of cruell men, and giue it
To a most Noble Iudge, the King my Maister.

Cham.
This is the Kings Ring.

Sur.
'Tis no counterfeit.

Suff.
'Ts the right Ring, by Heau'n: I told ye all,
When we first put this dangerous stone a rowling,
'Twold fall vpon our selues.

Norf.
Doe you thinke my Lords
The King will suffer but the little finger
Of this man to be vex'd?

Cham.
Tis now too certaine;
How much more is his Life in value with him?
Would I were fairely out on't.

Crom.
My mind gaue me,
In seeking tales and Informations
Against this man, whose honesty the Diuell
And his Disciples onely enuy at,
Ye blew the fire that burnes ye: now haue at ye.
Enter King frowning on them, takes his Seate.

Gard.
Dread Soueraigne, / How much are we bound to Heauen,
In dayly thankes; that gaue vs such a Prince;
Not onely good and wise, but most religious:
One that in all obedience, makes the Church
The cheefe ayme of his Honour, and to strengthen
That holy duty out of deare respect,
His Royall selfe in Iudgement comes to heare
The cause betwixt her, and this great offender.

Kin.
You were euer good at sodaine Commendations,
Bishop of Winchester. But know I come not
To heare such flattery now, and in my presence
They are too thin, and base to hide offences,
To me you cannot reach. You play the Spaniell,
And thinke with wagging of your tongue to win me:
But whatsoere thou tak'st me for; I'm sure
Thou hast a cruell Nature and a bloody.
Good man sit downe: Now let me see the proudest
Hee, that dares most, but wag his finger at thee.
By all that's holy, he had better starue,
Then but once thinke his place becomes thee not.

Sur.
May it please your Grace; ---

Kin.
No Sir, it doe's not please me,
I had thought, I had had men of some vnderstanding,
And wisedome of my Councell; but I finde none:
Was it discretion Lords, to let this man,
This good man (few of you deserue that Title)
This honest man, wait like a lowsie Foot-boy
At Chamber dore? and one, as great as you are?
Why, what a shame was this? Did my Commission
Bid ye so farre forget your selues? I gaue ye
Power, as he was a Counsellour to try him,
Not as a Groome: There's some of ye, I see,
More out of Malice then Integrity,
Would trye him to the vtmost, had ye meane,
Which ye shall neuer haue while I liue.

Chan.
Thus farre
My most dread Soueraigne, may it like your Grace,
To let my tongue excuse all. What was purpos'd
Concerning his Imprisonment, was rather
(If there be faith in men) meant for his Tryall,
And faire purgation to the world then malice,
I'm sure in me.

Kin.
Well, well my Lords respect him,
Take him, and vse him well; hee's worthy of it.
I will say thus much for him, if a Prince
May be beholding to a Subiect; I
Am for his loue and seruice, so to him.
Make me no more adoe, but all embrace him;
Be friends for shame my Lords: My Lord of Canterbury
I haue a Suite which you must not deny mee.
That is, a faire young Maid that yet wants Baptisme,
You must be Godfather, and answere for her.

Cran.
The greatest Monarch now aliue may glory
In such an honour: how may I deserue it,
That am a poore and humble Subiect to you?

Kin.
Come, come my Lord, you'd spare your
spoones; / You shall haue two noble Partners with you: the
old / Duchesse of Norfolke, and Lady Marquesse Dorset?
will these please you?
Once more my Lord of Winchester, I charge you
Embrace, and loue this man.

Gard.
With a true heart,
And Brother; loue I doe it.

Cran.
And let Heauen
Witnesse how deare, I hold this Confirmation.

Kin.
Good Man, those ioyfull teares shew thy true hearts,
The common voyce I see is verified
Of thee, which sayes thus: Doe my Lord of Canterbury
A shrewd turne, and hee's your friend for euer:
Come Lords, we trifle time away: I long
To haue this young one made a Christian.
As I haue made ye one Lords, one remaine:
So I grow stronger, you more Honour gaine.
Exeunt.
Original text
Act V, Scene IV
Noyse and Tumult within: Enter Porter and his man.

Port.
You'l leaue your noyse anon ye Rascals: doe you
take the Court for Parish Garden: ye rude Slaues, leaue
your gaping.
Within.
Good M. Porter I belong to
th'Larder.

Port.
Belong to th'Gallowes, and be hang'd ye Rogue:
Is this a place to roare in? Fetch me a dozen Crab-tree
staues, and strong ones; these are but switches to 'em:
Ile scratch your heads; you must be seeing Christenings?
Do you looke for Ale, and Cakes heere, you rude
Raskalls?

Man.
Pray Sir be patient; 'tis as much impossible,
Vnlesse wee sweepe 'em from the dore with Cannons,
To scatter 'em, as 'tis to make 'em sleepe
On May-day Morning, which will neuer be:
We may as well push against Powles as stirre 'em.

Por.
How got they in, and be hang'd?

Man.
Alas I know not, how gets the Tide in?
As much as one sound Cudgell of foure foote,
(You see the poore remainder) could distribute,
I made no spare Sir.

Port.
You did nothing Sir.

Man.
I am not Sampson, nor Sir Guy, nor Colebrand,
To mow 'em downe before me: but if I spar'd any
That had a head to hit, either young or old,
He or shee, Cuckold or Cuckold-maker:
Let me ne're hope to see a Chine againe,
And that I would not for a Cow, God saue her.
Within.
Do you heare M. Porter?

Port.
I shall be with you presently, good M.
Puppy, / Keepe the dore close Sirha.

Man.
What would you haue me doe?

Por.
What should you doe, / But knock 'em downe by
th'dozens? Is this More fields to muster in? Or haue wee
some strange Indian with the great Toole, come to Court,
the women so besiege vs? Blesse me, what a fry of
Fornication is at dore? On my Christian Conscience this
one Christening will beget a thousand, here will bee
Father, God-father, and all together.

Man.
The Spoones will be the bigger Sir: There is a fellow
somewhat neere the doore, he should be a Brasier by his
face, for o' my conscience twenty of the Dog-dayes now
reigne in's Nose; all that stand about him are vnder the
Line, they need no other pennance: that Fire-Drake did I
hit three times on the head, and three times was his
Nose discharged against mee; hee stands there like a
Morter-piece to blow vs. There was a Habberdashers
Wife of small wit, neere him, that rail'd vpon me, till her
pinck'd porrenger fell off her head, for kindling such a
combustion in the State. I mist the Meteor once, and
hit that Woman, who cryed out Clubbes, when I might
see from farre, some forty Truncheoners draw to her
succour, which were the hope o'th'Strond where she
was quartered; they fell on, I made good my place; at
length they came to th'broome staffe to me, I defide 'em
stil, when sodainly a File of Boyes behind 'em, loose
shot, deliuer'd such a showre of Pibbles, that I was faine
to draw mine Honour in, and let 'em win the Worke, the
Diuell was amongst 'em I thinke surely.

Por.
These are the youths that thunder at a Playhouse,
and fight for bitten Apples, that no Audience but the
tribulation of Tower Hill, or the Limbes of Limehouse,
their deare Brothers are able to endure. I haue some of
'em in Limbo Patrum, and there they are like to dance
these three dayes; besides the running Banquet of two
Beadles, that is to come.
Enter Lord Chamberlaine.

Cham.
Mercy o' me: what a Multitude are heere?
They grow still too; from all Parts they are comming,
As if we kept a Faire heere? Where are these Porters?
These lazy knaues? Y'haue made a fine hand fellowes?
Theres a trim rabble let in: are all these
Your faithfull friends o'th'Suburbs? We shall haue
Great store of roome no doubt, left for the Ladies,
When they passe backe from the Christening?

Por.
And't please your Honour,
We are but men; and what so many may doe,
Not being torne a pieces, we haue done:
An Army cannot rule 'em.

Cham.
As I liue,
If the King blame me for't; Ile lay ye all
By th'heeles, and sodainly: and on your heads
Clap round Fines for neglect: y'are lazy knaues,
And heere ye lye baiting of Bombards, when
Ye should doe Seruice.
Harke the Trumpets sound,
Th'are come already from the Christening,
Go breake among the preasse, and finde away out
To let the Troope passe fairely; or Ile finde
A Marshallsey, shall hold ye play these two Monthes.

Por.
Make way there, for the Princesse.

Man.
You great fellow,
Stand close vp, or Ile make your head ake.

Por.
You i'th'Chamblet, get vp o'th'raile,
Ile pecke you o're the pales else.
Exeunt.
Original text
Act V, Scene V
Enter Trumpets sounding: Then two Aldermen, L.
Maior, Garter, Cranmer, Duke of Norfolke with his
Marshals Staffe Duke of Suffolke, two Noblemen,
bearing great standing Bowles for the Christening Guifts:
Then foure Noblemen bearing a Canopy, vnder which the
Dutchesse of Norfolke, Godmother, bearing the Childe
richly habited in a Mantle, &c. Traine borne by a Lady:
Then followes the Marchionesse Dorset, the other Godmother,
and Ladies. The Troope passe once about the
Stage, and Garter speakes.

Gart.
Heauen From thy endlesse goodnesse, send prosperous
life, / Long, and euer happie, to the high and
Mighty Princesse of England Elizabeth.
Flourish. Enter King and Guard.

Cran.
And to your Royall Grace, & the good Queen,
My Noble Partners, and my selfe thus pray
All comfort, ioy in this most gracious Lady,
Heauen euer laid vp to make Parents happy,
May hourely fall vpon ye.

Kin.
Thanke you good Lord Archbishop:
What is her Name?

Cran.
Elizabeth.

Kin.
Stand vp Lord,
With this Kisse, take my Blessing: God protect thee,
Into whose hand, I giue thy Life.

Cran.
Amen.

Kin.
My Noble Gossips, y'haue beene too Prodigall;
I thanke ye heartily: So shall this Lady,
When she ha's so much English.

Cran.
Let me speake Sir,
For Heauen now bids me; and the words I vtter,
Let none thinke Flattery; for they'l finde 'em Truth.
This Royall Infant, Heauen still moue about her;
Though in her Cradle; yet now promises
Vpon this Land a thousand thousand Blessings,
Which Time shall bring to ripenesse: She shall be,
(But few now liuing can behold that goodnesse)
A Patterne to all Princes liuing with her,
And all that shall succeed: Saba was neuer
More couetous of Wisedome, and faire Vertue
Then this pure Soule shall be. All Princely Graces
That mould vp such a mighty Piece as this is,
With all the Vertues that attend the good,
Shall still be doubled on her. Truth shall Nurse her,
Holy and Heauenly thoughts still Counsell her:
She shall be lou'd and fear'd. Her owne shall blesse her;
Her Foes shake like a Field of beaten Corne,
And hang their heads with sorrow: / Good growes with her.
In her dayes, Euery Man shall eate in safety,
Vnder his owne Vine what he plants; and sing
The merry Songs of Peace to all his Neighbours.
God shall be truely knowne, and those about her,
From her shall read the perfect way of Honour,
And by those claime their greatnesse; not by Blood.
Nor shall this peace sleepe with her: But as when
The Bird of Wonder dyes, the Mayden Phoenix,
Her Ashes new create another Heyre,
As great in admiration as her selfe.
So shall she leaue her Blessednesse to One,
(When Heauen shal call her from this clowd of darknes)
Who, from the sacred Ashes of her Honour
Shall Star-like rise, as great in fame as she was,
And so stand fix'd. Peace, Plenty, Loue, Truth,Terror,
That were the Seruants to this chosen Infant,
Shall then be his, and like a Vine grow to him;
Where euer the bright Sunne of Heauen shall shine,
His Honour, and the greatnesse of his Name,
Shall be, and make new Nations. He shall flourish,
And like a Mountaine Cedar, reach his branches,
To all the Plaines about him: Our Childrens Children
Shall see this, and blesse Heauen.

Kin.
Thou speakest wonders.

Cran.
She shall be to the happinesse of England,
An aged Princesse; many dayes shall see her,
And yet no day without a deed to Crowne it.
Would I had knowne no more: But she must dye,
She must, the Saints must haue her; yet a Virgin,
A most vnspotted Lilly shall she passe
To th'ground, and all the World shall mourne her.

Kin.
O Lord Archbishop
Thou hast made me now a man, neuer before
This happy Child, did I get any thing.
This Oracle of comfort, ha's so pleas'd me,
That when I am in Heauen, I shall desire
To see what this Child does, and praise my Maker.
I thanke ye all. To you my good Lord Maior,
And you good Brethren, I am much beholding:
I haue receiu'd much Honour by your presence,
And ye shall find me thankfull. Lead the way Lords,
Ye must all see the Queene, and she must thanke ye,
She will be sicke els. This day, no man thinke
'Has businesse at his house;s for all shall stay:
This Little-One shall make it Holy-day.
Exeunt.
Modern text
Act V, Scene I
Enter Gardiner, Bishop of Winchester, a Page with a
torch before him, met by Sir Thomas Lovell

GARDINER
It's one o'clock, boy, is't not?

PAGE
It hath struck.

GARDINER
These should be hours for necessities,
Not for delights, times to repair our nature
With comforting repose, and not for us
To waste these times. Good hour of night, Sir Thomas!
Whither so late?

LOVELL
Came you from the King, my lord?

GARDINER
I did, Sir Thomas, and left him at primero
With the Duke of Suffolk.

LOVELL
I must to him too,
Before he go to bed. I'll take my leave.

GARDINER
Not yet, Sir Thomas Lovell. What's the matter?
It seems you are in haste. An if there be
No great offence belongs to't, give your friend
Some touch of your late business. Affairs that walk,
As they say spirits do, at midnight, have
In them a wilder nature than the business
That seeks dispatch by day.

LOVELL
My lord, I love you,
And durst commend a secret to your ear
Much weightier than this work. The Queen's in labour,
They say, in great extremity, and feared
She'll with the labour end.

GARDINER
The fruit she goes with
I pray for heartily, that it may find
Good time, and live; but for the stock, Sir Thomas,
I wish it grubbed up now.

LOVELL
Methinks I could
Cry the amen, and yet my conscience says
She's a good creature and, sweet lady, does
Deserve our better wishes.

GARDINER
But, sir, sir,
Hear me, Sir Thomas. You're a gentleman
Of mine own way; I know you wise, religious;
And let me tell you, it will ne'er be well –
'Twill not, Sir Thomas Lovell, take't of me –
Till Cranmer, Cromwell – her two hands – and she
Sleep in their graves.

LOVELL
Now, sir, you speak of two
The most remarked i'th' kingdom. As for Cromwell,
Beside that of the Jewel House, is made Master
O'th' Rolls, and the King's secretary; further, sir,
Stands in the gap and trade of more preferments,
With which the time will load him. Th' Archbishop
Is the King's hand and tongue, and who dare speak
One syllable against him?

GARDINER
Yes, yes, Sir Thomas,
There are that dare, and I myself have ventured
To speak my mind of him; and indeed this day,
Sir – I may tell it you – I think I have
Incensed the lords o'th' Council that he is –
For so I know he is, they know he is –
A most arch heretic, a pestilence
That does infect the land; with which they, moved,
Have broken with the King, who hath so far
Given ear to our complaint, of his great grace
And princely care, foreseeing those fell mischiefs
Our reasons laid before him, hath commanded
Tomorrow morning to the Council board
He be convented. He's a rank weed, Sir Thomas,
And we must root him out. From your affairs
I hinder you too long. Good night, Sir Thomas.

LOVELL
Many good nights, my lord; I rest your servant.
Exeunt Gardiner and Page
Enter the King and Suffolk

KING HENRY
Charles, I will play no more tonight.
My mind's not on't; you are too hard for me.

SUFFOLK
Sir, I did never win of you before.

KING HENRY
But little, Charles,
Nor shall not, when my fancy's on my play.
Now, Lovell, from the Queen what is the news?

LOVELL
I could not personally deliver to her
What you commanded me, but by her woman
I sent your message, who returned her thanks
In the great'st humbleness, and desired your highness
Most heartily to pray for her.

KING HENRY
What sayst thou, ha?
To pray for her? What, is she crying out?

LOVELL
So said her woman, and that her sufferance made
Almost each pang a death.

KING HENRY
Alas, good lady!

SUFFOLK
God safely quit her of her burden, and
With gentle travail, to the gladding of
Your highness with an heir!

KING HENRY
'Tis midnight, Charles;
Prithee to bed, and in thy prayers remember
Th' estate of my poor Queen. Leave me alone,
For I must think of that which company
Would not be friendly to.

SUFFOLK
I wish your highness
A quiet night, and my good mistress will
Remember in my prayers.

KING HENRY
Charles, good night.
Exit Suffolk
Enter Sir Anthony Denny
Well, sir, what follows?

DENNY
Sir, I have brought my lord the Archbishop,
As you commanded me.

KING HENRY
Ha? Canterbury?

DENNY
Ay, my good lord.

KING HENRY
'Tis true. Where is he, Denny?

DENNY
He attends your highness' pleasure.

KING HENRY
Bring him to us.
Exit Denny

LOVELL
(aside)
This is about that which the Bishop spake;
I am happily come hither.
Enter Cranmer and Denny

KING HENRY
Avoid the gallery.
Lovell seems to stay
Ha! I have said. Be gone.
What?
Exeunt Lovell and Denny

CRANMER
(aside)
I am fearful – wherefore frowns he thus?
'Tis his aspect of terror. All's not well.

KING HENRY
How now, my lord? You desire to know
Wherefore I sent for you.

CRANMER
(kneeling)
It is my duty
T' attend your highness' pleasure.

KING HENRY
Pray you, arise,
My good and gracious Lord of Canterbury.
Come, you and I must walk a turn together;
I have news to tell you. Come, come, give me your hand.
Ah, my good lord, I grieve at what I speak,
And am right sorry to repeat what follows.
I have, and most unwillingly, of late
Heard many grievous – I do say, my lord,
Grievous – complaints of you; which, being considered,
Have moved us and our Council that you shall
This morning come before us, where I know
You cannot with such freedom purge yourself
But that, till further trial in those charges
Which will require your answer, you must take
Your patience to you and be well contented
To make your house our Tower. You a brother of us,
It fits we thus proceed, or else no witness
Would come against you.

CRANMER
(kneeling)
I humbly thank your highness,
And am right glad to catch this good occasion
Most throughly to be winnowed, where my chaff
And corn shall fly asunder, for I know
There's none stands under more calumnious tongues
Than I myself, poor man.

KING HENRY
Stand up, good Canterbury;
Thy truth and thy integrity is rooted
In us, thy friend. Give me thy hand, stand up;
Prithee let's walk. Now, by my holidame,
What manner of man are you? My lord, I looked
You would have given me your petition that
I should have ta'en some pains to bring together
Yourself and your accusers, and to have heard you
Without indurance further.

CRANMER
Most dread liege,
The good I stand on is my truth and honesty.
If they shall fail, I with mine enemies
Will triumph o'er my person, which I weigh not,
Being of those virtues vacant. I fear nothing
What can be said against me.

KING HENRY
Know you not
How your state stands i'th' world, with the whole world?
Your enemies are many, and not small; their practices
Must bear the same proportion, and not ever
The justice and the truth o'th' question carries
The due o'th' verdict with it. At what ease
Might corrupt minds procure knaves as corrupt
To swear against you? Such things have been done.
You are potently opposed, and with a malice
Of as great size. Ween you of better luck,
I mean in perjured witness, than your Master,
Whose minister you are, whiles here He lived
Upon this naughty earth? Go to, go to;
You take a precipice for no leap of danger,
And woo your own destruction.

CRANMER
God and your majesty
Protect mine innocence, or I fall into
The trap is laid for me!

KING HENRY
Be of good cheer;
They shall no more prevail than we give way to.
Keep comfort to you, and this morning see
You do appear before them. If they shall chance,
In charging you with matters, to commit you,
The best persuasions to the contrary
Fail not to use, and with what vehemency
Th' occasion shall instruct you. If entreaties
Will render you no remedy, this ring
Deliver them, and your appeal to us
There make before them. Look, the good man weeps!
He's honest, on mine honour. God's blest mother!
I swear he is true-hearted, and a soul
None better in my kingdom. Get you gone,
And do as I have bid you.
Exit Cranmer
He has strangled
His language in his tears.
Enter Old Lady

GENTLEMAN
(within)
Come back! What mean you?
Enter Lovell, following her

OLD LADY
I'll not come back; the tidings that I bring
Will make my boldness manners. Now good angels
Fly o'er thy royal head, and shade thy person
Under their blessed wings!

KING HENRY
Now by thy looks
I guess thy message. Is the Queen delivered?
Say ‘ Ay, and of a boy.’

OLD LADY
Ay, ay, my liege,
And of a lovely boy. The God of heaven
Both now and ever bless her! 'Tis a girl
Promises boys hereafter. Sir, your Queen
Desires your visitation, and to be
Acquainted with this stranger. 'Tis as like you
As cherry is to cherry.

KING HENRY
Lovell!

LOVELL
Sir?

KING HENRY
Give her an hundred marks. I'll to the Queen.
Exit

OLD LADY
An hundred marks? By this light, I'll ha' more.
An ordinary groom is for such payment.
I will have more, or scold it out of him.
Said I for this the girl was like to him? I'll
Have more, or else unsay't; and now, while 'tis hot,
I'll put it to the issue.
Exeunt
Modern text
Act V, Scene II
Pursuivants, pages, and others, attending before the
Council Chamber
Enter Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury

CRANMER
I hope I am not too late, and yet the gentleman
That was sent to me from the Council prayed me
To make great haste. All fast? What means this? Ho!
Who waits there?
Enter Keeper
Sure, you know me?

KEEPER
Yes, my lord,
But yet I cannot help you.

CRANMER
Why?
Enter Doctor Butts

KEEPER
Your grace
Must wait till you be called for.

CRANMER
So!

BUTTS
(aside)
This is a piece of malice. I am glad
I came this way so happily; the King
Shall understand it presently.
Exit

CRANMER
(aside)
'Tis Butts,
The King's physician. As he passed along,
How earnestly he cast his eyes upon me!
Pray heaven he sound not my disgrace! For certain
This is of purpose laid by some that hate me –
God turn their hearts! I never sought their malice –
To quench mine honour. They would shame to make me
Wait else at door, a fellow Councillor,
'Mong boys, grooms, and lackeys. But their pleasures
Must be fulfilled, and I attend with patience.
Enter the King and Butts, at a window above

BUTTS
I'll show your grace the strangest sight –

KING HENRY
What's that, Butts?

BUTTS
I think your highness saw this many a day.

KING HENRY
Body o'me, where is it?

BUTTS
There, my lord –
The high promotion of his grace of Canterbury,
Who holds his state at door, 'mongst pursuivants,
Pages, and footboys.

KING HENRY
Ha! 'Tis he indeed.
Is this the honour they do one another?
'Tis well there's one above 'em yet. I had thought
They had parted so much honesty among 'em –
At least good manners – as not thus to suffer
A man of his place, and so near our favour,
To dance attendance on their lordships' pleasures,
And at the door too, like a post with packets.
By holy Mary, Butts, there's knavery!
Let 'em alone, and draw the curtain close;
We shall hear more anon.
They partly close the curtain, but remain watching;
Cranmer withdraws to wait without
Modern text
Act V, Scene III
A council-table brought in with chairs and stools, and
placed under the state. Enter Lord Chancellor, places
himself at the upper end of the table on the left hand,
a seat being left void above him, as for Canterbury's
seat. Duke of Suffolk, Duke of Norfolk, Surrey, Lord
Chamberlain, Gardiner, seat themselves in order on
each side; Cromwell at lower end, as secretary
Keeper at the door

LORD CHANCELLOR
Speak to the business, master secretary:
Why are we met in council?

CROMWELL
Please your honours,
The chief cause concerns his grace of Canterbury.

GARDINER
Has he had knowledge of it?

CROMWELL
Yes.

NORFOLK
Who waits there?

KEEPER
Without, my noble lords?

GARDINER
Yes.

KEEPER
My lord Archbishop,
And has done half an hour, to know your pleasures.

LORD CHANCELLOR
Let him come in.

KEEPER
Your grace may enter now.
Cranmer approaches the council-table

LORD CHANCELLOR
My good lord Archbishop, I'm very sorry
To sit here at this present and behold
That chair stand empty, but we all are men
In our own natures frail, and capable
Of our flesh; few are angels; out of which frailty
And want of wisdom, you, that best should teach us,
Have misdemeaned yourself, and not a little,
Toward the King first, then his laws, in filling
The whole realm, by your teaching and your chaplains' –
For so we are informed – with new opinions,
Divers and dangerous, which are heresies,
And, not reformed, may prove pernicious.

GARDINER
Which reformation must be sudden too,
My noble lords; for those that tame wild horses
Pace 'em not in their hands to make 'em gentle,
But stop their mouths with stubborn bits and spur 'em
Till they obey the manage. If we suffer,
Out of our easiness and childish pity
To one man's honour, this contagious sickness,
Farewell all physic – and what follows then?
Commotions, uproars, with a general taint
Of the whole state, as of late days our neighbours,
The upper Germany, can dearly witness,
Yet freshly pitied in our memories.

CRANMER
My good lords, hitherto in all the progress
Both of my life and office, I have laboured,
And with no little study, that my teaching
And the strong course of my authority
Might go one way, and safely; and the end
Was ever to do well. Nor is there living –
I speak it with a single heart, my lords –
A man that more detests, more stirs against,
Both in his private conscience and his place,
Defacers of a public peace than I do.
Pray heaven the King may never find a heart
With less allegiance in it! Men that make
Envy and crooked malice nourishment
Dare bite the best. I do beseech your lordships
That, in this case of justice, my accusers,
Be what they will, may stand forth face to face,
And freely urge against me.

SUFFOLK
Nay, my lord,
That cannot be; you are a Councillor,
And by that virtue no man dare accuse you.

GARDINER
My lord, because we have business of more moment,
We will be short with you. 'Tis his highness' pleasure
And our consent, for better trial of you,
From hence you be committed to the Tower;
Where, being but a private man again,
You shall know many dare accuse you boldly,
More than, I fear, you are provided for.

CRANMER
Ah, my good Lord of Winchester, I thank you;
You are always my good friend. If your will pass,
I shall both find your lordship judge and juror,
You are so merciful. I see your end:
'Tis my undoing. Love and meekness, lord,
Become a churchman better than ambition.
Win straying souls with modesty again;
Cast none away. That I shall clear myself,
Lay all the weight ye can upon my patience,
I make as little doubt as you do conscience
In doing daily wrongs. I could say more,
But reverence to your calling makes me modest.

GARDINER
My lord, my lord, you are a sectary,
That's the plain truth. Your painted gloss discovers,
To men that understand you, words and weakness.

CROMWELL
My Lord of Winchester, you are a little,
By your good favour, too sharp. Men so noble,
However faulty, yet should find respect
For what they have been. 'Tis a cruelty
To load a falling man.

GARDINER
Good master secretary,
I cry your honour mercy; you may worst
Of all this table say so.

CROMWELL
Why, my lord?

GARDINER
Do not I know you for a favourer
Of this new sect? Ye are not sound.

CROMWELL
Not sound?

GARDINER
Not sound, I say.

CROMWELL
Would you were half so honest!
Men's prayers then would seek you, not their fears.

GARDINER
I shall remember this bold language.

CROMWELL
Do.
Remember your bold life too.

LORD CHANCELLOR
This is too much;
Forbear, for shame, my lords.

GARDINER
I have done.

CROMWELL
And I.

LORD CHANCELLOR
Then thus for you, my lord: it stands agreed,
I take it, by all voices, that forthwith
You be conveyed to th' Tower a prisoner,
There to remain till the King's further pleasure
Be known unto us. Are you all agreed, lords?

ALL
We are.

CRANMER
Is there no other way of mercy,
But I must needs to th' Tower, my lords?

GARDINER
What other
Would you expect? You are strangely troublesome.
Let some o'th' guard be ready there.
Enter the Guard

CRANMER
For me?
Must I go like a traitor thither?

GARDINER
Receive him,
And see him safe i'th' Tower.

CRANMER
Stay, good my lords,
I have a little yet to say. Look there, my lords.
By virtue of that ring I take my cause
Out of the gripes of cruel men, and give it
To a most noble judge, the King my master.

LORD CHAMBERLAIN
This is the King's ring.

SURREY
'Tis no counterfeit.

SUFFOLK
'Tis the right ring, by heaven. I told ye all,
When ye first put this dangerous stone a-rolling,
'Twould fall upon ourselves.

NORFOLK
Do you think, my lords,
The King will suffer but the little finger
Of this man to be vexed?

LORD CHANCELLOR
'Tis now too certain.
How much more is his life in value with him!
Would I were fairly out on't!
Exit King above

CROMWELL
My mind gave me,
In seeking tales and informations
Against this man, whose honesty the devil
And his disciples only envy at,
Ye blew the fire that burns ye. Now have at ye!
Enter the King frowning on them; takes his seat

GARDINER
Dread sovereign, how much are we bound to heaven
In daily thanks, that gave us such a prince,
Not only good and wise, but most religious;
One that in all obedience makes the church
The chief aim of his honour, and, to strengthen
That holy duty, out of dear respect,
His royal self in judgement comes to hear
The cause betwixt her and this great offender.

KING HENRY
You were ever good at sudden commendations,
Bishop of Winchester. But know I come not
To hear such flattery now, and in my presence
They are too thin and bare to hide offences;
To me you cannot reach. You play the spaniel,
And think with wagging of your tongue to win me;
But whatsoe'er thou tak'st me for, I'm sure
Thou hast a cruel nature and a bloody.
(to Cranmer)
Good man, sit down. Now let me see the proudest,
He that dares most, but wag his finger at thee.
By all that's holy, he had better starve
Than but once think this place becomes thee not.

SURREY
May it please your grace –

KING HENRY
No, sir, it does not please me.
I had thought I had had men of some understanding
And wisdom of my Council, but I find none.
Was it discretion, lords, to let this man,
This good man – few of you deserve that title –
This honest man, wait like a lousy footboy
At chamber door? – and one as great as you are?
Why, what a shame was this! Did my commission
Bid ye so far forget yourselves? I gave ye
Power as he was a Councillor to try him,
Not as a groom. There's some of ye, I see,
More out of malice than integrity,
Would try him to the utmost, had ye mean;
Which ye shall never have while I live.

LORD CHANCELLOR
Thus far,
My most dread sovereign, may it like your grace
To let my tongue excuse all. What was purposed
Concerning his imprisonment was rather –
If there be faith in men – meant for his trial
And fair purgation to the world than malice,
I'm sure, in me.

KING HENRY
Well, well, my lords, respect him.
Take him and use him well; he's worthy of it.
I will say thus much for him: if a prince
May be beholding to a subject, I
Am, for his love and service, so to him.
Make me no more ado, but all embrace him;
Be friends, for shame, my lords! My Lord of Canterbury,
I have a suit which you must not deny me:
That is, a fair young maid that yet wants baptism;
You must be godfather, and answer for her.

CRANMER
The greatest monarch now alive may glory
In such an honour. How may I deserve it,
That am a poor and humble subject to you?

KING HENRY
Come, come, my lord, you'd spare your
spoons. You shall have two noble partners with you, the
old Duchess of Norfolk and Lady Marquess Dorset.
Will these please you?
Once more, my Lord of Winchester, I charge you
Embrace and love this man.

GARDINER
With a true heart
And brother-love I do it.

CRANMER
And let heaven
Witness how dear I hold this confirmation.

KING HENRY
Good man, those joyful tears show thy true heart.
The common voice, I see, is verified
Of thee, which says thus: ‘ Do my lord of Canterbury
A shrewd turn and he's your friend for ever.’
Come, lords, we trifle time away; I long
To have this young one made a Christian.
As I have made ye one, lords, one remain;
So I grow stronger, you more honour gain.
Exeunt
Modern text
Act V, Scene IV
Noise and tumult within. Enter Porter and his Man

PORTER
You'll leave your noise anon, ye rascals. Do you
take the court for Parish Garden? Ye rude slaves, leave
your gaping.

SERVANT
(within)
Good master porter, I belong to
th' larder.

PORTER
Belong to th' gallows, and be hanged, ye rogue!
Is this a place to roar in? Fetch me a dozen crab-tree
staves, and strong ones: these are but switches to 'em.
I'll scratch your heads. You must be seeing christenings?
Do you look for ale and cakes here, you rude
rascals?

MAN
Pray, sir, be patient. 'Tis as much impossible,
Unless we sweep 'em from the door with cannons,
To scatter 'em as 'tis to make 'em sleep
On May-day morning; which will never be.
We may as well push against Paul's as stir 'em.

PORTER
How got they in, and be hanged?

MAN
Alas, I know not. How gets the tide in?
As much as one sound cudgel of four foot –
You see the poor remainder – could distribute,
I made no spare, sir.

PORTER
You did nothing, sir.

MAN
I am not Samson, nor Sir Guy, nor Colbrand,
To mow 'em down before me; but if I spared any
That had a head to hit, either young or old,
He or she, cuckold or cuckold-maker,
Let me ne'er hope to see a chine again –
And that I would not for a cow, God save her!

SERVANT
(within)
Do you hear, master porter?

PORTER
I shall be with you presently, good master
puppy. Keep the door close, sirrah.

MAN
What would you have me do?

PORTER
What should you do, but knock 'em down by
th' dozens? Is this Moorfields to muster in? Or have we
some strange Indian with the great tool come to court,
the women so besiege us? Bless me, what a fry of
fornication is at door! On my Christian conscience, this
one christening will beget a thousand: here will be
father, godfather, and all together.

MAN
The spoons will be the bigger, sir. There is a fellow
somewhat near the door, he should be a brazier by his
face, for, o'my conscience, twenty of the dog-days now
reign in's nose; all that stand about him are under the
line, they need no other penance. That fire-drake did I
hit three times on the head, and three times was his
nose discharged against me; he stands there like a
mortar-piece, to blow us. There was a haberdasher's
wife of small wit near him, that railed upon me till her
pinked porringer fell off her head, for kindling such a
combustion in the state. I missed the meteor once, and
hit that woman, who cried out ‘ Clubs!’, when I might
see from far some forty truncheoners draw to her
succour, which were the hope o'th' Strand, where she
was quartered. They fell on; I made good my place. At
length they came to th' broomstaff to me; I defied 'em
still; when suddenly a file of boys behind 'em, loose
shot, delivered such a shower of pebbles that I was fain
to draw mine honour in, and let 'em win the work. The
devil was amongst 'em, I think, surely.

PORTER
These are the youths that thunder at a playhouse,
and fight for bitten apples, that no audience but the
tribulation of Tower Hill or the limbs of Limehouse,
their dear brothers, are able to endure. I have some of
'em in Limbo Patrum, and there they are like to dance
these three days, besides the running banquet of two
beadles that is to come.
Enter the Lord Chamberlain

LORD CHAMBERLAIN
Mercy o' me, what a multitude are here!
They grow still, too; from all parts they are coming,
As if we kept a fair here! Where are these porters,
These lazy knaves? You've made a fine hand, fellows!
There's a trim rabble let in: are all these
Your faithful friends o'th' suburbs? We shall have
Great store of room, no doubt, left for the ladies,
When they pass back from the christening.

PORTER
An't please your honour,
We are but men, and what so many may do,
Not being torn a-pieces, we have done.
An army cannot rule 'em.

LORD CHAMBERLAIN
As I live,
If the King blame me for't, I'll lay ye all
By th' heels, and suddenly; and on your heads
Clap round fines for neglect. You're lazy knaves,
And here ye lie baiting of bombards, when
Ye should do service.
Trumpets
Hark! The trumpets sound;
They're come already from the christening.
Go break among the press, and find a way out
To let the troop pass fairly, or I'll find
A Marshalsea shall hold ye play these two months.

PORTER
Make way there for the Princess.

MAN
You great fellow,
Stand close up, or I'll make your head ache.

PORTER
You i'th' camlet, get up o'th' rail;
I'll peck you o'er the pales else.
Exeunt
Modern text
Act V, Scene V
Enter trumpets, sounding; then two Aldermen, Lord
Mayor, Garter, Cranmer, Duke of Norfolk with his
marshal's staff, Duke of Suffolk, two noblemen
bearing great standing bowls for the christening gifts;
then four noblemen bearing a canopy, under which the
Duchess of Norfolk, godmother, bearing the child
richly habited in a mantle, etc., train borne by a Lady;
then follows the Marchioness Dorset, the other godmother,
and ladies. The troop pass once about the
stage, and Garter speaks

GARTER
Heaven, from thy endless goodness, send prosperous
life, long, and ever happy, to the high and
mighty Princess of England, Elizabeth!
Flourish. Enter the King and Guard

CRANMER
(kneeling)
And to your royal grace, and the good Queen!
My noble partners and myself thus pray
All comfort, joy, in this most gracious lady,
Heaven ever laid up to make parents happy,
May hourly fall upon ye!

KING HENRY
Thank you, good lord Archbishop.
What is her name?

CRANMER
Elizabeth.

KING HENRY
Stand up, lord.
The King kisses the child
With this kiss take my blessing: God protect thee!
Into Whose hand I give thy life.

CRANMER
Amen.

KING HENRY
My noble gossips, you've been too prodigal;
I thank ye heartily. So shall this lady
When she has so much English.

CRANMER
Let me speak, sir,
For heaven now bids me, and the words I utter
Let none think flattery, for they'll find 'em truth.
This royal infant – heaven still move about her! –
Though in her cradle, yet now promises
Upon this land a thousand thousand blessings,
Which time shall bring to ripeness. She shall be –
But few now living can behold that goodness –
A pattern to all princes living with her,
And all that shall succeed. Saba was never
More covetous of wisdom and fair virtue
Than this pure soul shall be. All princely graces
That mould up such a mighty piece as this is,
With all the virtues that attend the good,
Shall still be doubled on her. Truth shall nurse her,
Holy and heavenly thoughts still counsel her;
She shall be loved and feared. Her own shall bless her;
Her foes shake like a field of beaten corn,
And hang their heads with sorrow. Good grows with her;
In her days every man shall eat in safety
Under his own vine what he plants, and sing
The merry songs of peace to all his neighbours.
God shall be truly known, and those about her
From her shall read the perfect ways of honour,
And by those claim their greatness, not by blood.
Nor shall this peace sleep with her; but as when
The bird of wonder dies, the maiden phoenix,
Her ashes new-create another heir
As great in admiration as herself,
So shall she leave her blessedness to one –
When heaven shall call her from this cloud of darkness –
Who from the sacred ashes of her honour
Shall star-like rise, as great in fame as she was,
And so stand fixed. Peace, plenty, love, truth, terror,
That were the servants to this chosen infant,
Shall then be his, and like a vine grow to him.
Wherever the bright sun of heaven shall shine,
His honour and the greatness of his name
Shall be, and make new nations. He shall flourish,
And like a mountain cedar reach his branches
To all the plains about him; our children's children
Shall see this, and bless heaven.

KING HENRY
Thou speakest wonders.

CRANMER
She shall be, to the happiness of England,
An aged princess; many days shall see her,
And yet no day without a deed to crown it.
Would I had known no more! But she must die –
She must, the saints must have her – yet a virgin;
A most unspotted lily shall she pass
To th' ground, and all the world shall mourn her.

KING HENRY
O lord Archbishop,
Thou hast made me now a man; never before
This happy child, did I get anything.
This oracle of comfort has so pleased me,
That when I am in heaven I shall desire
To see what this child does, and praise my Maker.
I thank ye all. To you, my good Lord Mayor,
And you, good brethren, I am much beholding:
I have received much honour by your presence,
And ye shall find me thankful. Lead the way, lords;
Ye must all see the Queen, and she must thank ye;
She will be sick else. This day, no man think
'Has business at his house, for all shall stay:
This little one shall make it holiday.
Exeunt
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2020 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL