MONTJOY
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You know me by my habit. You know me by my habit.H5 III.vi.111
My Masters mind. My master's mind.H5 III.vi.114
Thus sayes my King: Say thou to Harry of Thus says my King: ‘ Say thou to Harry ofH5 III.vi.116
England, Though we seem'd dead, we did but sleepe: England, Though we seemed dead, we did but sleep.H5 III.vi.117
Aduantage is a better Souldier then rashnesse. Tell him, Advantage is a better soldier than rashness. Tell himH5 III.vi.118
wee could haue rebuk'd him at Harflewe, but that wee we could have rebuked him at Harfleur, but that weH5 III.vi.119
thought not good to bruise an iniurie, till it were full thought not good to bruise an injury till it were fullH5 III.vi.120
ripe. Now wee speake vpon our Q. and our voyce is ripe. Now we speak upon our cue, and our voice isH5 III.vi.121
imperiall: England shall repent his folly, see his weakenesse, imperial: England shall repent his folly, see his weakness,H5 III.vi.122
and admire our sufferance. Bid him therefore consider and admire our sufferance. Bid him therefore considerH5 III.vi.123
of his ransome, which must proportion the losses we of his ransom, which must proportion the losses weH5 III.vi.124
haue borne, the subiects we haue lost, the disgrace we have borne, the subjects we have lost, the disgrace weH5 III.vi.125
haue digested; which in weight to re-answer, his pettinesse have digested; which in weight to re-answer, his pettinessH5 III.vi.126
would bow vnder. For our losses, his Exchequer is would bow under. For our losses, his exchequer isH5 III.vi.127
too poore; for th' effusion of our bloud, the Muster of his too poor; for th' effusion of our blood, the muster of hisH5 III.vi.128
Kingdome too faint a number; and for our disgrace, his kingdom too faint a number; and for our disgrace, hisH5 III.vi.129
owne person kneeling at our feet, but a weake and worthlesse own person kneeling at our feet but a weak and worthlessH5 III.vi.130
satisfaction. To this adde defiance: and tell him for satisfaction. To this add defiance: and tell him forH5 III.vi.131
conclusion, he hath betrayed his followers, whose conclusion, he hath betrayed his followers, whoseH5 III.vi.132
condemnation is pronounc't: So farre my King and condemnation is pronounced.’ So far my King andH5 III.vi.133
Master; so much my Office. master; so much my office.H5 III.vi.134
Mountioy. Montjoy.H5 III.vi.136
I shall deliuer so: Thankes to your Highnesse. I shall deliver so. Thanks to your highness.H5 III.vi.165
Once more I come to know of thee King Harry,Once more I come to know of thee, King Harry,H5 IV.iii.79
If for thy Ransome thou wilt now compound,If for thy ransom thou wilt now compound,H5 IV.iii.80
Before thy most assured Ouerthrow:Before thy most assured overthrow:H5 IV.iii.81
For certainly, thou art so neere the Gulfe,For certainly thou art so near the gulfH5 IV.iii.82
Thou needs must be englutted. Besides, in mercyThou needs must be englutted. Besides, in mercy,H5 IV.iii.83
The Constable desires thee, thou wilt mindThe Constable desires thee thou wilt mindH5 IV.iii.84
Thy followers of Repentance; that their SoulesThy followers of repentance, that their soulsH5 IV.iii.85
May make a peacefull and a sweet retyreMay make a peaceful and a sweet retireH5 IV.iii.86
From off these fields: where (wretches) their poore bodiesFrom off these fields, where, wretches, their poor bodiesH5 IV.iii.87
Must lye and fester.Must lie and fester.H5 IV.iii.88.1
The Constable of France.The Constable of France.H5 IV.iii.89
I shall, King Harry. And so fare thee well:I shall, King Harry. And so fare thee well:H5 IV.iii.126
Thou neuer shalt heare Herauld any more. Thou never shalt hear herald any more.H5 IV.iii.127
No great King:No, great King;H5 IV.vii.68.2
I come to thee for charitable License,I come to thee for charitable licence,H5 IV.vii.69
That we may wander ore this bloody field,That we may wander o'er this bloody fieldH5 IV.vii.70
To booke our dead, and then to bury them,To book our dead, and then to bury them,H5 IV.vii.71
To sort our Nobles from our common men.To sort our nobles from our common men.H5 IV.vii.72
For many of our Princes (woe the while)For many of our princes – woe the while! – H5 IV.vii.73
Lye drown'd and soak'd in mercenary blood:Lie drowned and soaked in mercenary blood;H5 IV.vii.74
So do our vulgar drench their peasant limbesSo do our vulgar drench their peasant limbsH5 IV.vii.75
In blood of Princes, and with wounded steedsIn blood of princes, and their wounded steedsH5 IV.vii.76
Fret fet-locke deepe in gore, and with wilde rageFret fetlock-deep in gore, and with wild rageH5 IV.vii.77
Yerke out their armed heeles at their dead masters,Yerk out their armed heels at their dead masters,H5 IV.vii.78
Killing them twice. O giue vs leaue great King,Killing them twice. O, give us leave, great King,H5 IV.vii.79
To view the field in safety, and disposeTo view the field in safety, and disposeH5 IV.vii.80
Of their dead bodies.Of their dead bodies!H5 IV.vii.81.1
The day is yours.The day is yours.H5 IV.vii.84.2
They call it Agincourt.They call it Agincourt.H5 IV.vii.87
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