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Search phrase: ass

Plays

 89 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.99wine; but if thou beest not an ass, I am a youth of fourteen;wine. But if thou be'st not an asse, I am a youth of fourteene:
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.326That every braggart shall be found an ass.That euery braggart shall be found an Asse.
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.ii.35And I, an ass, am onion-eyed. For shame,And I an Asse, am Onyon-ey'd; for shame,
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.306That I might hear thee call great Caesar assThat I might heare thee call great Casar Asse,
As You Like ItAYL II.v.48That any man turn ass,that any man turne Asse:
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.209If thou art changed to aught, 'tis to an ass.If thou art chang'd to ought, 'tis to an Asse.ass="Apple-converted-space"> 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.211'Tis so, I am an ass; else it could never be'Tis so, I am an Asse, else it could neuer be,ass="Apple-converted-space"> 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.15.1I think thou art an ass.I thinke thou art an asse.ass="Apple-converted-space"> 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.18You would keep from my heels, and beware of an ass.You would keepe from my heeles, and beware of an asse.ass="Apple-converted-space"> 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.47Thou wouldst have changed thy face for a name, or thy name for an ass.Thou wouldst haue chang'd thy face for a name, or thy name for anass="Apple-converted-space"> asse.ass="Apple-converted-space"> 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.77I am an ass, I am a woman'sI am an asse, I am a womans
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.26Thou art sensible in nothing but blows; and so is an ass.Thou art sensible in nothing but blowes, and so is an Asse.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.27I am an ass, indeed. You mayI am an Asse indeede, you may
CoriolanusCor II.i.55I find the ass in compound with the major part of yourI finde the Asse in compound, with the Maior part of your
CoriolanusCor IV.v.46an ass it is! Then thou dwell'st with daws too?an Asse it is, then thou dwel'st with Dawes too?
CymbelineCym I.iii.35of an ass, which is no great hurt.of an Asse, which is no great hurt.
CymbelineCym II.i.52Should yield the world this ass! A woman thatShould yeild the world this Asse: A woman, that
HamletHam II.ii.394Then came each actor on his assThen can each Actor on his Asse---
HamletHam II.ii.580Why, what an ass am I! This is most brave,Who? What an Asse am I? I sure, this is most braue,
HamletHam V.i.57your dull ass will not mend his pace with beating. Andyour dull Asse will not mend his pace with beating; and
HamletHam V.i.78the pate of a politician, which this ass now o'erreaches;the Pate of a Polititian which this Asse o're Offices:
HamletHam V.ii.43And many suchlike as's of great charge,And many such like Assis of great charge,
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.i.35in such dealing, unless a woman should be made an ass,in such dealing, vnles a woman should be made an Asse
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.71Come, you virtuous ass, you bashfulCome you pernitious Asse, you bashfull
Henry VH5 III.ii.68By Cheshu, he is an ass, as in the world; IBy Cheshu he is an Asse, as in the World, I
Henry VH5 IV.i.76If the enemy is an ass, and a fool, and aIf the Enemie is an Asse and a Foole, and a
Henry VH5 IV.i.78also, look you, be an ass, and a fool, and a pratingalso, looke you, be an Asse and a Foole, and a prating
Henry VH5 V.i.4in all things. I will tell you ass my friend, Captainin all things: I will tell you asse my friend, Captaine
Julius CaesarJC IV.i.21He shall but bear them as the ass bears gold,He shall but beare them, as the Asse beares Gold,
Julius CaesarJC IV.i.26Like to the empty ass, to shake his ears(Like to the empty Asse) to shake his eares,
King JohnKJ II.i.144As great Alcides' shows upon an ass.As great Alcides shooes vpon an Asse:
King JohnKJ II.i.145But, ass, I'll take that burden from your back,But Asse, Ile take that burthen from your backe,
King LearKL I.iv.159parts, thou borest thine ass on thy back o'er the dirtparts, thou boar'st thine Asse on thy backe o're the durt,
King LearKL I.iv.219May not an ass know when the cart draws theMay not an Asse know, when the Cart drawes the
Love's Labour's LostLLL III.i.50for an ass.for an Asse.
Love's Labour's LostLLL III.i.52Marry, sir, you must send the ass upon the horse,Marrie sir, you must send the Asse vpon the Horse
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.622Therefore, as he is an ass, let him go.Therefore as he is, an Asse, let him go:
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.625For the ass to the Jude. Give it him. Jude-as, away!For the Asse to the Iude: giue it him. Iud-as away.
Measure for MeasureMM III.i.26For, like an ass, whose back with ingots bows,For like an Asse, whose backe with Ingots bowes;
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.498One all of luxury, an ass, a madman,One all of Luxurie, an asse, a mad man:
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.159me drunk, yet I am not altogether an ass.me drunke, yet I am not altogether an asse.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.285himself hath not such a name. Page is an ass, a securehimselfe hath not such a name. Page is an Asse, a secure
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.286ass. He will trust his wife, he will not be jealous. I willAsse; hee will trust his wife, hee will not be iealous: I will
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.119I do begin to perceive that I am made an ass.I do begin to perceiue that I am made an Asse.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.110What do you see? You see an ass head of yourWhat do you see? You see an Asse-head of your
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.114I see their knavery! This is to make an ass of me,I see their knauery; this is to make an asse of me,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.34Titania waked, and straightway loved an ass.Tytania waked, and straightway lou'd an Asse.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.25I am such a tender ass, if my hair do but tickle me, II am such a tender asse, if my haire do but tickle me, I
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.76Methought I was enamoured of an ass.Me-thought I was enamoured of an Asse.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.205is but an ass if he go about to expound this dream. Methoughtis but an Asse, if he goe about to expound this dreame. Me-thought
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.303and prove an ass.and proue an Asse.
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.ii.71Away! You are an ass, you are an ass.Away, you are an asse, you are an asse.
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.ii.74down an ass! But, masters, remember that I am an ass;downe an asse! but masters, remember that I am an asse:
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.ii.76an ass. No, thou villain, thou art full of piety, as shall bean asse: No thou villaine, yu art full of piety as shall be
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.ii.84I had been writ down an ass!I had been writ downe an asse!
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.243place shall serve, that I am an ass.place shall serue, that I am an Asse.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.293me ass; I beseech you, let it be remembered in hismee asse, I beseech you let it be remembred in his
OthelloOth I.i.47Wears out his time, much like his master's ass,Weares out his time, much like his Masters Asse,
OthelloOth II.i.300For making him egregiously an ass,For making him egregiously an Asse,
Richard IIR2 V.v.93And yet I bear a burden like an ass,And yet I beare a burthen like an Asse,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.158O this woodcock, what an ass it is!Oh this Woodcocke, what an Asse it is.
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.i.9Preposterous ass, that never read so farPreposterous Asse that neuer read so farre,
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.231My horse, my ox, my ass, my any thing,My horse, my oxe, my asse, my any thing,
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.75Away, away, mad ass! His name is Lucentio, andAwaie, awaie mad asse, his name is Lucentio, and
The TempestTem V.i.296And seek for grace. What a thrice double assAnd seeke for grace: what a thrice double Asse
Timon of AthensTim I.i.276I will fly, like a dog, the heels o'th' ass.I will flye like a dogge, the heeles a'th'Asse.
Timon of AthensTim III.v.50And the ass more captain than the lion,And the Asse, more Captaine then the Lyon?
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.333peradventure thou wert accused by the ass. If thou wertperaduenture thou wert accus'd by the Asse: If thou wert
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.334the ass, thy dullness would torment thee, and still thouthe Asse, thy dulnesse would torment thee; and still thou
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.351How has the ass broke the wall, that thou art outHow ha's the Asse broke the wall, that thou art out
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.25(Aside) Now what a thing it is to be an ass!Now what a thing it is to be an Asse?
Troilus and CressidaTC II.i.44assinico may tutor thee. Thou scurvy-valiant ass, thouAsinico may tutor thee. Thou scuruy valiant Asse, thou
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.311again, that I might water an ass at it! I had rather be aagaine, that I might water an Asse at it: I had rather be a
Troilus and CressidaTC V.i.55forced with wit, turn him to? To an ass were nothing;forced with wit, turne him too: to an Asse were nothing;
Troilus and CressidaTC V.i.56he is both ass and ox. To an ox were nothing; he is bothhee is both Asse and Oxe; to an Oxe were nothing, hee is both
Troilus and CressidaTC V.i.57ox and ass. To be a dog, a mule, a cat, a fitchew, a toad,Oxe and Asse: to be a Dogge, a Mule, a Cat, a Fitchew, a Toade,
Troilus and CressidaTC V.iv.5see them meet, that that same young Trojan ass, thatsee them meet; that, that same yong Troian asse, that
Twelfth NightTN I.iii.71Why, I think so. I am not such an ass, butWhy I thinke so: I am not such an asse, but
Twelfth NightTN II.iii.17Welcome, ass! Now let's have a catch.Welcome asse, now let's haue a catch.
Twelfth NightTN II.iii.141but a time-pleaser, an affectioned ass that consbut a time-pleaser, an affection'd Asse, that cons
Twelfth NightTN II.iii.162ass.Asse.
Twelfth NightTN II.iii.163Ass, I doubt not.Asse, I doubt not.
Twelfth NightTN III.ii.12'Slight! Will you make an ass o' me?S'light; will you make an Asse o'me.
Twelfth NightTN V.i.16Marry, sir, they praise me – and make an ass of me.Marry sir, they praise me, and make an asse of me,
Twelfth NightTN V.i.17Now my foes tell me plainly, I am an ass; so that by mynow my foes tell me plainly, I am an Asse: so that by my
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iii.33matter? Why weepest thou, man? Away, ass, you'll losematter? why weep'st thou man? away asse, you'l loose
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.v.22What an ass art thou! I understand thee not.What an asse art thou, I vnderstand thee not.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.v.41Why, thou whoreson ass, thou mistakest me.Why, thou whorson Asse, thou mistak'st me,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.ii.28That such an ass should owe them.That such an Asse should owe them.

Glossary

 4 result(s).
asinico[pron: asi'neekoh] little ass, donkey, dolt
assWelsh pronunciation of 'as'
assinico, asinico, assenego[pron: asi'neekoh] little ass, donkey, dolt
coltfoolish youth, callow ass

Thesaurus

 3 result(s).
ass, callowcolt
ass, littleassinico, asinico, assenego
callow asscolt

Themes and Topics

 1 result(s).
Welsh

Words Families

 3 result(s).
Word FamilyWord Family GroupWords
ASSBASICass n
ASSPART OF BODYasshead n
ASSHEADBASICsee ASS
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